The original scan for this article is at: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1901-03-23/ed-1/seq-7/.
 
New-York Daily Tribune, March 23, 1901, page 7:

SUIT  AGAINST  MARCONI  DISMISSED.

CONTENTION  THAT  DOLBEAR  WAS  INVENTOR  OF  WIRELESS  TELEGRAPHY  NOT  UPHELD.

    Justice Coxe, in the United States Circuit Court, has dismissed the suit of Lyman C. Learned asking that Guglielmo Marconi be perpetually enjoined from using or selling certain inventions in wireless telegraphy now used by Marconi and which Learned claimed as his property. Learned asked further for $100,000 damages.
    Learned, who brought suit as the assignee of the inventions of A. E. Dolbear, of Boston, alleged in his complaint that Dolbear was the true and original inventor of the system of wireless telegraphy. Patents had been issued to Dolbear in December, 1882 and October, 1886. Marconi's invention, he said, by reason of faults in construction, was not fitted for commercial uses and Marconi had, therefore, made use of Dolbear's system.
    Marconi, in his reply, admitted that patents had been issued to Dolbear, but said there had never been a practical demonstration of the commercial value of the inventions. He denied having infringed on Dolbear's rights. Dr. J. A. Flemming, Pender professor of electrical engineering in the University College, London, and Charles R. Cross, Thayer professor of physics in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, were witnesses for Marconi. They testified that his inventions were the practical adaptation to wireless telegraphy of various discoveries in the field of electrical science.