United States Senate Documents, Volume 26 (4245), 57th Congress, 1st Session, Document No. 346, pages 1-3:

 
57TH CONGRESS, }
1st Session.
SENATE.
     { DOCUMENT
No. 346.
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AMERICAN  WIRELESS  TELEPHONE  AND  TELEGRAPH  COMPANY.

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Mr. PENROSE presented the following
 
PETITION  OF  THE  AMERICAN  WIRELESS  TELEPHONE  AND  TELEGRAPH  COMPANY,  OF  PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  PRAYING  THE  EXTENSION  FOR  TEN  YEARS  OF  LETTERS  PATENT  NO.  350,299,  BEING  THE  BASIC  PATENT  FOR  THE  ART  OF  WIRELESS  TELEGRAPHY  AND  TELEPHONY  GRANTED  TO  AMOS  EMERSON  DOLBEAR  IN  1886.
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MAY 7, 1902.--Referred to the Committee on Patents and ordered to be printed.
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To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled:
    Your petitioner, the American Wireless Telephone and Telegraph Company, a corporation created by and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the Territory of Arizona, prays that Letters Patent No. 350,299, being the art or basic patent for the art of wireless telegraphy and telephony, granted to Amos Emerson Dolbear by the Commissioner of Patents of the United States on the 5th day of October, A. D. 1886, whereof your petitioner is now sole owner, by assignment, may be extended for the term of ten years from the 4th day of October, A. D. 1903.
    And your petitioner will ever pray, etc.
AMERICAN WIRELESS TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY,    
By G. P. GEHRING, M. D., President.                        
    Attest:
WM. J. MOSS, Secretary.    

STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA,
          County of Philadelphia, ss:
    On this 8th day of April, A. D. 1902, before me, a notary public for the State of Pennsylvania, in and for the county of Philadelphia, residing in the city of Philadelphia, personally appeared William J. Moss, by me being personally known, and he, being by me duly sworn according to law upon his oath, did depose and say that G. P. Gehring, M. D., is the president and this deponent is secretary of the American Wireless Telephone and Telegraph Company, the foregoing petitioner; that all the statements and account contained in the foregoing petition are true; that he personally saw the said G. P. Gehring, M. D., as president of the American Wireless Telephone and Telegraph Company, sign the foregoing petition, whereupon deponent attested the same as secretary; that he well knows and is familiar with the common or corporate seal of the said American Wireless Telephone and Telegraph Company, and that the seal impressed upon said petition is such common or corporate seal, and, further, that deponent personally witnessed the impression of said common or corporate seal made upon said petition by the said G. P. Gehring, M. D., as president of said petitioner.
WM. J. J. MOSS.    

    Sworn to and subscribed before me at Philadelphia, Pa., this 8th day of April, A. D. 1902.
    [SEAL.]J. N. FORT, Jr.,            
Notary Public.    
    (My commission expires January 19, 1903).
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To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled:
    The petition of the subscriber, the American Wireless Telephone and Telegraph Company, a corporation created by and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the Territory of Arizona, and hereto appended, respectfully shows that Letters Patent No. 350299 of the United States of America are the art or basic patents for wireless telephony and telegraphy and were granted by the Commissioner of Patents unto Amos Emerson Dolbear on the 5th day of October, A. D. 1886;
    That said letters patent will expire by limitation on or about the 4th day of October, A. D. 1903;
    That said Amos Emerson Dolbear was an American citizen, residing at the city of Boston, in the State of Massachusetts, and United States of America, and has assiduously devoted many years of strenuous labor and large sums of money in order to perfect his said art for which said letters patent were granted to him;
    That said art was perfected and letters patent were granted therefor about fifteen years prior to the ability of the people of this country to realize and recognize the enormous value of said art to the public.
    That the petitioner, who is now the sole owner of said letters patent, by assignment, has expended large sums of money in demonstrating to the world the practical use and utility of said art and inventions, not only in a mercantile way, but for information and the saving of life and property.
    That the petitioner, notwithstanding its great expense and outlay in the education of the public by way of information and actual demonstration of the value of said art, not only to it but as well to the Government itself, has been unable to realize or take therefrom as yet any profits whatever from the use of said invention or art, but has a large expended investment therein, upon which it would be only equitable and just to it and of vast benefit to the Government of the United States and as well the citizens thereof that said petitioner should be allowed to reap the reward earned and due it by reason and on account of said expenditure of time, labor, and money.
    That at its own cost, without assistance or encouragement, in the year 1901, the petitioner received, transmitted, and reported by its system the bulletins of the great international yacht races.
    That since that time the petitioner has expended further large sums of money in the perfection of improvements upon its original art or basic patents, the erection of stations, investment in vessel property, laboratory work, and the building of instruments, besides expenses of operation.
    That said petition should be seriously considered by your honorable body, the petition allowed and the extension granted, because said perfection and invention of the art of wireless telephony and telegraphy is the result of American genius, knowledge, toil, and expense, and the benefits to be derived therefrom should and would thereby be allowed and preserved to the American Government and its citizens, who are justly and firstly entitled thereto, with the benefit to the people whose investment has already been made therein, whether in labor or money or both, and their encouragement to continue.
    That by said extension the petitioner will be enabled to further develop its systems to the great gain and benefit of the Government of the United States and its citizens, as well as the world at large, besides the just and well-deserved reward to the petitioner which has been earned and to which it is so justly entitled.

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