Selected extracts about radio from the "Annual Report of the Commissioner of Navigation to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1912". (Submitted November 13, 1912 from Commissioner Eugene Tyler Chamberlain to Secretary Charles Nagel.)
 
Pages 34-43:
WIRELESS  SHIP  ACT.

    The act of June 24, 1910, to require apparatus and operators for radio communication on certain ocean steamers took effect on July 1, 1911. The first year of its operation has amply demonstrated the wisdom of its enactment. At home Congress has greatly extended its scope. Abroad its general principles have been indorsed by the International Radiotelegraphic Conference at London, in June and July, and recommended to maritime powers as the basis of legislation. A British merchant shipping advisory committee, appointed in April from representatives of British commercial maritime interests, recommended on July 24, that the substantial features of the act of June 24, 1910, be enacted by Parliament, and the president of the board of trade has announced that a bill on the subject has been prepared. The several events which have demonstrated the foresight of Congress in passing the original act of 1910 and extending in 1912 its scope and provisions are known to all.
    The act which went into effect on July 1, 1911, in brief provided that on all ocean-passenger vessels, American and foreign, carrying 50 or more persons, including passengers and crew, from ports of the United States to ports 200 miles or more distant there must be efficient apparatus for radio communication, with a skilled operator in charge, capable of transmitting messages at least 100 miles by day. To prevent monopoly the act also required that the apparatus on ships, as a condition of efficiency, must exchange messages without regard to the system employed.
    Soon after Congress assembled a bill was introduced in the Senate on December 14, 1911, prescribing that two operators should be required after July 1, 1912, on all ocean steamships carrying 100 or more passengers. The Department's brief experience with the law had shown that some measures were necessary to provide against situations which, might arise during the time when the operator was necessarily off duty and asleep. While search for some means within the act was in made the stranding of the steamship Prinz Joachim in November created a sentiment in favor of two operators and a constant wireless watch, which was embodied in the bill mentioned. The act which finally resulted from a conference of the two branches of Congress and was approved on July 23, 1912, provides, in addition to two operators, that there shall be an auxiliary power supply, independent of the vessel's main power plant, and thus available in case of disaster disabling that plant, which shall be capable of carrying on communication for at least four hours over a distance of at least 100 miles. The question of this auxiliary power supply was carefully considered in the conference of the Senate and the House. An alternative proposition that the auxiliary power supply should be capable of operating for as long as six hours, but over the shorter distance of 80 miles, was discussed. The conclusion was reached that in the event of disaster the immediate utterance of the distress call over the widest practicable stretch of waters was of the first importance, and that a call sent over 100 miles for a possible period of four hours would usually be more efficacious than a call sent over only 80 miles, but possibly maintained for six hours. The likelihood of a ship remaining afloat after a serious disaster for four hours is, of course, greater than for six hours, and the conclusion reached by Congress in this respect will probably not be changed. It has proved entirely feasible to secure the auxiliary apparatus prescribed, and the work of installing it has made rapid progress, under tests of the Department's inspectors, with the cooperation of naval stations.
    The act of 1912 also provides that there shall at all times be efficient communication between the radio room and the ship's bridge. The purpose of this requirement is twofold: First, to enable the master of the vessel to be certain that an operator is at all times on watch, and, second, both to enable the master to communicate orders promptly to the operator and to enable the operator to communicate to the master at once information necessary to the safety of his own ship or the peril of other ships. The act also affirms the supreme authority of the captain of the ship over both the operators and apparatus, which is an obvious necessity.
    The act of 1910 applied only to ocean-passenger steamers carrying 50 or more persons, including passengers and crew. The act of 1912 extends the scope of the measure in several particulars. After October 1, 1912, apparatus and operators were required on passenger ships licensed under the inspection laws to carry 50 or more, as well as those actually carrying that number, in order to provide the safeguard of radio communication during the dangerous winter months or ships which carry a passenger list much below the number authorized by their certificates.
    After July 1, 1913, the act will apply to ocean-cargo steamers carrying a crew of 50 or more, with the qualification, however, that the second operator may be a member of the crew, who shall keep watch only for distress calls and calls relating to danger, and will thus be able to call the operator in emergency when off duty. The owners of American cargo steamers have already voluntarily begun the installation of the apparatus and employment of the operators prescribed months in advance of the law. It is not improbable that foreign ship owners and possibly foreign governments may deem a less rigid requirement desirable in their own ports. Unofficially it is stated that the German proposition contemplates compulsory apparatus on ships carrying a minimum of 60 persons. The report of the British advisory committee already referred to contains the following suggestion on the subject, which may be of academic interest here:
    We are of the opinion that if Parliament, in the interests of the community, compels any of the cargo vessels to carry wireless installations, the owners of such vessels should be reimbursed out of the public funds for any expenditure imposed on them by complying with such compulsory requirements.
    After April 1, 1913, the act of 1912 will apply to passenger and car steamers on the Great Lakes. Many Lake vessels are already so equipped, and Lake shipowners themselves requested that the act be applied on those waters. In fact, however, there are no cargo boats on the Lakes which have crews of 50 or more persons, and the great majority of the passenger steamers make runs of less than 200 nautical miles between ports.

SCOPE  OF  THE  ACT.

    In last year's report it was estimated that the act of June 24, 1910, would apply to 10,000 departures of passenger steamers during the fiscal year. During the month of July, 1912, the total number of departures of American vessels subject to the act was 946 and of foreign vessels 261, in all 1,207 for that month from 28 seaports, indicating fully 12,000 departures for the year. Of course, in the case of American ships both terminals are included, as voyages between American ports are usually less than a month in duration. Thus, one American steamer in trade between San Francisco and Honolulu or between New York and New Orleans will depart from both ports during a month. The departures of cargo vessels, which, after July 1, 1913, will be subject to the act, were reported by collectors of customs for July, 1912, as 100 American steamers and 67 foreign steamers, 167 in all, for the month, and probably 1,600 for the year. Collectors at 10 Great Lakes ports report for July the departure of 218 American vessels and 101 foreign vessels (92 from the Marquette district) which, after April 1, 1913, will be subject to the act. It is probable, however, that in these returns some vessels have been included which do not, in fact, make voyages of 200 nautical miles between ports. The lake season of navigation lasts but 8 months, and it does not seem likely that during this period, when the law is actually applied, more than about 1,000 departures of passenger steamers will fall within the act. Of course, large numbers of passengers are carried on some of these vessels.

YEAR'S  OPERATIONS.

    The preliminary work and work of the first three months under the act of June 24, 1910, were covered in last year's report. During the fiscal year the three inspectors made 2,207 careful inspections of the apparatus of ocean-passenger steamships shortly before their departure. The details of vessels inspected are printed in Appendix K. The total cost of the service was $6,959.01, or a trifle less than $3.11 for each inspection. Of the inspections 1,408 were at Atlantic and Gulf ports and 799 at Pacific ports. The inspections at New York numbered 1,076 and at Boston 30, in all 1,106 for that district; at San Francisco, 785; Port Townsend, 13; and Portland, Oreg., 1; in all, 799 for that district; and for the rest of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts 238 at Baltimore, 15 at Philadelphia, 3 at Norfolk, 8 at Savannah, Ga., 1 at Brunswick, Ga., 3 at Jacksonville, Fla., 1 at Knights Key, Fla., 1 at Key West, Fla., 25 at New Orleans, La., 5 at Galveston, Tex., 1 at Tampa, Fla., and 1 at Mobile; in all, 302 for that district.
    The inspectors were established at New York, whence two short inspection trips were made to Boston; at San Francisco, whence one short trip was made to San Pedro and Los Angeles, one short trip to Portland, Oreg., Tacoma and Port Townsend, Wash., and two short trips to Seattle (one to experiment with auxiliary apparatus at sea). The Baltimore inspector made one general trip to all the principal seaports from Baltimore to Galveston, stopping about a day at each to advise collectors of customs. One trip was made to Philadelphia and an additional trip to New Orleans.
    The appropriation did not suffice to establish an inspector at Gulf ports, where one was plainly required, but as soon as Congress increased to $10,000 this appropriation an inspector was sent early m July to New Orleans. The need of Government inspection has been demonstrated daily, and the service has been cordially approved by the masters and owners of steamships. The apparatus is delicate and easily disarranged, and in numerous instances the operators have relied on the inspectors for instruction in readjustment. The art itself is relatively new, and constant experiments in apparatus are being attempted, the results of which are not always satisfactory. It has been the aim of the Bureau to keep the inspectors in close touch with the Bureau of Standards so that they may be advised of the latest demonstrated improvements, and by giving the captains, operators, and owners of ships the benefit of this knowledge they may further contribute to the safety of ocean navigation. The furnishing of apparatus and operators to ships is a commercial venture, the aim of which is profit, yet on that venture may depend the safety of thousands of ocean travelers. All the considerations in favor of Government inspection, which were set forth in last year's report, have been justified by the year's experience.

REGULATION  OF  MONOPOLY.

    In last year's report the steps taken by Congress thus far to prevent the establishment of a monopoly in radio communication were referred to. The value of radio communication, or wireless telegraphy, as an instrumentality for promoting safety of life at sea has impelled within two years the prompt enactment of measures prescribing apparatus and operators on nearly all types of vessels to which they are adapted, and an extension of the scope of the legislation in the immediate future does not seem necessary or desirable. The requirements of the laws have created a demand for apparatus and operators which have taxed the resources of manufacturers and schools, and in some respects, especially in the matter of auxiliary apparatus, the Department has been required at times to show some leniency until the supply could be brought up with the demand.
    The first act of 1910 required interchange between different systems of radio communication in order to prevent monopoly and the same principle was extended in the ratification of the Berlin Radiotelegraphic Convention and the act to regulate radio communication. The power to fix rates for messages also seems ample. In very few instances do steamers own their own radio apparatus and employ their operators. The usual course is to pay to the wireless company a fixed monthly or yearly rental which covers the installation and use of the apparatus and the wages of operators. The board and lodging of the operators, of course, are furnished by the ship; the apparatus is kept in repair by the wireless company, and messages relating to navigation and the ship's business are transmitted free of charge. The tolls for the messages of passengers are collected by the operator for the benefit of the wireless company installing the apparatus. So long as several wireless companies were competing in the United States for the business of supplying apparatus and operators for ships, the usual economic law of supply and demand regulated charges for installations. Indeed, so keen was the rivalry for business that, as has been developed by Government inspections under the act of 1910, apparatus far short of the reasonable requirements of the law had in some instances been supplied, and in some cases ships have been about to depart with apparatus inert and useless, until the Department's inspector disclosed to the master the situation.
    Within the past few months competition in the United States has nearly ceased. Partly as the result of decisions in patent cases before the courts of the United States, and partly as the result of internal financial conditions of the corporations, the United Wireless Co., hitherto the most extensive American company in the business, has been absorbed by the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. of America. The National Electric Signaling Co., a corporation which has made large expenditures in experiments and developing highgrade apparatus, in consequence of decisions by the courts, has gone into the hands of receivers, and does not at present supply apparatus to ships. There are several lesser companies, which have not for several years been active factors in the market. Practically the supply of apparatus and operators for radio communication in the United States is now in the hands of the Marconi company of America. The apparatus is a necessity of modern navigation. The report of the British merchant shipping advisory committee already mentioned, after reviewing the progress of British patent cases, observes:
    We have arrived at the conclusion that any British shipowner dealing with the Marconi company's competitors will do so at the risk of costly litigation, and, further, as matters stand at present, any effective competition with the Marconi company in the supply of installations may be impracticable. In considering the present commercial position it must be further borne in mind that so long as the rival patents are held in only a few hands, there is risk of the competitors amalgamating or of pooling their commercial interests, so as to obtain on joint account the best possible price for all their installations. This risk is emphasized by the fact that whilst the Telefunken system is at war with the Marconi system in this country they are apparently working as an amalgamated company in Germany. It would, in our opinion, be impossible to require by law merchant vessels to be fitted with wireless telegraphic apparatus if thereby shipowners were delivered into the hands of a monopoly which could impose such terms as it pleased without stay or hindrance. Before Parliament can apply compulsion to any class of ship, it must therefore, in our opinion, first establish the conditions of a free market in the installations, or otherwise insure their supply to merchant vessels at a reasonable commercial cost and under reasonable commercial conditions.
    In England, under the acquired patent of 1897 of Sir Oliver Lodge, the Marconi company is bound "to grant licenses to all who desire to make use of the protected invention, on such terms as a duly qualified arbitrator, to be nominated by the board of trade, shall think fair and reasonable." The board of trade referred to is, of course, the department of the British Government corresponding in powers and scope to the Department of Commerce and Labor.
    The licenses about to be issued by this Department, under the act to regulate radio communication to commercial ship and coast stations, contain the following, condition:
    3. The authority conferred by this license is subject to the provisions of the act of February 4, 1887, entitled "An act to regulate commerce," as amended by the act of June 18, 1910, so far as the licensee may be within the operation of said act, and except as provided in the act of August 13, 1912, or in the International Radiotelegraphic Convention and regulations made part thereof, the station shall transmit all messages offered by those who tender lawful rates on equal terms without discrimination, whether as regards rates, order of transmission, or otherwise.
    The maximum rates for messages will be fixed in the license in accord with the Berlin convention and the act to regulate radio communication.
    It will be recalled that section 7 of the act of June 18, 1910, brought wire or wireless telegraph companies within the scope of the interstate commerce act of 1887. The clause quoted in the form of license adopted is designed to be a full expression of the powers which Congress has entrusted to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor in the matter of message rates, but it does not extend to the charges for rentals, and apparently the commerce act of 1887 as amended does not meet the situation. That result could be attained by extending the authority the Secretary of Commerce and Labor now has over licenses, under the act of August 13 and the international convention, so as to enable him to exercise the powers as an arbitrator over rental charges with which the British Board of Trade has been entrusted. A more satisfactory way of solving the problem perhaps may be found.

BERLIN  RADIOTELEGRAPHIC  CONVENTION.

    The Senate on April 3 ratified the Berlin Radiotelegraphic Convention. The general purpose of that convention is to secure the maximum efficiency of the new instrumentality in communication between ships at sea and between ships and coast stations, especially in so far as distress signals and information concerning navigation are involved. The regulations are international, and in principle are the same as those upon which the international code of signals by means of flags, pennants, and burgees was based nearly 70 years ago. The difference in the workings, range, and efficacy of the two systems is a measure of human advance in that period. The convention binds each nation to enact legislation to give it effect. Early in the session and long before the convention was ratified the committees of the Senate and the House of Representatives, having jurisdiction, began to frame the law to give effect to the treaty and to secure to the United States the benefits which the experience of nations generally had demonstrated would result from the regulation of radio communication.

REGULATION  OF  RADIO  COMMUNICATION.

    The act to regulate radio communication was approved on August 13 and will take effect on December 13. In brief it prescribes that all apparatus and operators for radio communication within the jurisdiction of the United States (except Government stations and operators and those in the Philippines) shall be licensed by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor. Such licenses are prescribed by the international convention so far as international communication is concerned, and the act thus carries out the obligation of the United States. The same principle is applied to all land stations and operators within constitutional jurisdiction. The tendency abroad for some years was to restrict the use of the invention to military and naval purposes, but as its commercial feasibility and value have been demonstrated, its larger use within reasonable limitations has been provided for, and the act of August 13, in the main, is based on the power to regulate interstate and foreign commerce, with the power to provide for the common defense invoked in certain portions of the measure.
    The act differs in one essential respect from general legislation of recent years in that it does not delegate wide powers of regulation to an executive department, but in the body of the statute itself states with particularity the regulations which are to govern administrative officers and private interests alike. The act has not yet taken effect, but in the preparations for its enforcement the specific requirements of the act have, in the main, helped rather than hindered preliminary work, and have proved preferable to a wider latitude of administrative authority.
    The time allowed to carry out the act was somewhat short in view of its application to the entire United States and to ship and land stations, which will number several thousands. The act was passed August 13 and the appropriation to give it effect on August 26. Civil-service examinations for positions of radio inspector, for which the test papers had been prepared in advance of the appropriation, were held on September 25 throughout the country, and the first inspectors were appointed on probation on October 16. The examinations furnished a body of young men especially qualified by practical experience and by scientific attainments. To make sure that practical men had been secured, the successful applicants were assigned for brief terms of duty at the port of New York, where nearly all varieties of radio apparatus may be examined, and at the Bureau of Standards, to familiarize them with the latest scientific developments in radio communication. The administration of the law is thus in the hands of a competent and intelligent field force. The inspectors were at their posts by November 18.
    The preparation of the necessary forms and blanks has advanced rapidly and special instruments for the use of inspectors have been devised by the Bureau of Standards and will be available as soon as the manufacturers can turn them out, which will not be until January. In the meantime that Bureau, with the cooperation of scientific institutions which are interested in the success of the law, is assisting inspectors with the loan of instruments and with temporary devices to assist in the performance of their preliminary work. Although endeavors in all lines to carry out the act have been maintained constantly at high pressure since the adjournment of Congress, it is probable that preparations will not be completed in all parts of the country by December 13, and especially in States bordering on the Great Lakes, where navigation will soon close. Through interior States the act can not be carried out before 1913. The companies operating radio apparatus for commercial purposes in many instances must make changes in antiquated apparatus to bring it into conformity with law, and it is quite probable that these changes will not be completed in all instances by December 13.
    The act to regulate radio communication is closely interwoven with the wireless-ship act of 1910, and the administrative machinery to carry out the two laws and the Berlin convention have been consolidated. The entire United States has been divided for the purpose into nine districts, as follows:
  1. BOSTON, MASS.---Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut.
  2. NEW YORK, N. Y.---New York (county of New York, Staten Island, Long Island, and counties on the Hudson River to and including Albany, and Rensselaer) and New Jersey (counties of Bergen, Passaic, Essex, Hudson, Union, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean).
  3. BALTIMORE, MD.---New Jersey (all counties not included in second district), Pennsylvania (counties of Philadelphia, Delaware, all counties south of the Blue Mountains, and Franklin County), Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, District of Columbia.
  4. SAVANNAH, GA.---North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Porto Rico.
  5. NEW ORLEANS, LA.---Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico.
  6. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.--- California, Hawaii, Nevada, Utah, Arizona.
  7. SEATTLE, WASH.---Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming.
  8. CLEVELAND, OHIO.---New York (all counties not included in second district), Pennsylvania (all counties not included in third district), West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan (lower peninsula).
  9. CHICAGO, ILL.---Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan (upper peninsula), Minnesota, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota.
    The division is tentative and is based partly with a view to the amount of work for each inspector and partly with a view to economy in traveling expenses. Experience will doubtless suggest some modification of these districts.
    The cordial cooperation of the Navy Department with the Department of Commerce and Labor in enforcing the act of 1910 was mentioned in last year's report. It has been maintained and greatly extended, and the cooperation of the War Department (Signal Corps) has been offered with equal courtesy. As a result the examination of operators for licenses prescribed are now held at the United States navy yards at Boston, Mass., Brooklyn, N. Y., Philadelphia, Pa., Washington, D. C., Norfolk, Va., Charleston, S. C., New Orleans, La., Mare Island (San Francisco), Cal., and Puget Sound, Wash.; at the naval stations at Key West, Fla., San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, Hawaii; at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.; also at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Tex., Fort Wood, New York Harbor, Fort Monroe (artillery school), Va., Fort Omaha, Nebr., and Fort Leavenworth, Kans.; at the Army stations at St. Michael, Alaska, and Fairbanks, Alaska; also at the Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C., and by the Department's radio inspectors at the customhouses in their districts and elsewhere by arrangement with them.
    Office accommodations for the radio inspectors, through the courtesy of the Treasury Department, have been secured in the offices of collectors of customs, with whom the ship work brings them in daily contact at eight principal ports; but at Boston, where a new customhouse is under construction, it may prove necessary to rent a small office for the inspector. The appropriation by Congress provided for this contingency.

APPROPRIATIONS.

    For the current fiscal year Congress appropriated $10,000 in the legislative appropriation act for the enforcement of the act of June 24, 1910, an amount indispensable to give force and vitality to the original act. During the past session, as already indicated, the requirements of that act were considerably increased and its scope was materially extended; the Berlin convention was ratified, and the act to give it effect and to govern radio communication generally was passed. To carry out these measures Congress, in the general deficiency act, appropriated $27,880, which may be consolidated with the former sum, making $37,880 available for the current year, or, strictly speaking, for 10 months after the second appropriation was passed.
    The estimate for the 12 months of the next fiscal year, which is, of course, now included in one item for the legislative bill, amounts to $38,140. The initial cost of securing testing instruments, which are somewhat expensive, equipping offices, and setting type at the Printing Office for the first issue of the various forms and blanks needed will be met out of the current appropriations, so that the laws can be carried out for 12 months after July 1, 1913, at a cost substantially the same as for less than 10 months in part for the current year. A summary of the purposes for which the money was desired was submitted in August to the Appropriation Committees of both branches of Congress.

GOVERNMENT  COAST  STATIONS.

    In virtually every other country except the United States and in all the great colonies of European countries the radio shore stations are owned and operated by the governments, respectively. The reasons for this ownership and operation were considered at some length in this report last year.
    The eighteenth regulation of the act of August 13, 1912, provides that the cordon of naval coast radio stations which protect our entire coasts and outlying territories and possessions shall be available for commercial service whenever a commercial station is not maintained within 100 miles of the nearest naval station, or at any point when the commercial station does not insure a constant service day and night without interruption. At the strategic points--Key West, Fla., San Juan, P. R., North Head and Tatoosh Island, Wash., and San Diego, Cal.--commercial messages will hereafter be handled entirely by the naval stations, and in Alaska commercial radio communication will continue to be conducted as at present, through the stations of the Signal Corps of the Army. Considerations which tell in favor of the system of complete government ownership of coast stations here, as abroad, were set forth at some length in last year's report, and experience during the current year should do much to determine whether they are practical.

LONDON  RADIOTELEGRAPHIC  CONFERENCE.

    The diplomatic appropriation act provided for the participation of the United States, as recommended by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, in the International Radiotelegraphic Convention at London in June and July. The American delegation was able to submit to the assembled representatives of maritime powers the legislation which Congress had taken up in December and January and advanced far toward enactment before the disaster to the steamship Titanic impressed upon the world the usefulness of such legislation. The seal of secrecy has not been removed from the London convention which, with or without amendments, will doubtless in time be submitted to the Senate. That seal, however, is not broken by the statement that the action of Congress at the last session contributed greatly to the requirements of the new convention in so far as they relate directly to safety at sea, and provide for greater certainty of maritime communication through the use of pure and sharp waves.
 
Pages 149-163:
APPENDIX K.

RADIO  APPARATUS  ON  VESSELS.

1.  SUMMARY OF INPECTIONS OF APPARATUS BY RADIO INSPECTORS,  BY PORTS.

New York.
Boston.
Philadelphia.   
Baltimore.
Norfolk.
Savannah.
Brunswick.
Jacksonville.
Knights Key.
Key West.
  1,076
30
15
238
3
8
1
3
1
1
Tampa.
Mobile.
New Orleans.
Galveston.
Port Townsend.    
San Francisco.
Portland, Oreg.
 
          Total.
1
1
25
5
13
    785
1
____
2,207

2.  SUMMARY OF VESSELS EQUIPPED UNDER THE ACT,  BY NATIONALITIES.

United States.    
British.
German.
French.
Japanese.
Italian.
Spanish.
Austrian.
Dutch.
Russian.
   206
147
55
27
21
19
12
9
8
6
Belgian.
Brazilian.
Cuban.
Norwegian.
Danish.
Greek.
Honduranean.   
 
         Total.
     5
5
5
5
4
4
2
____
540

3.  VESSELS EQUIPPED SUBJECT TO THE ACT AND INSPECTED BY THE WIRELESS INSPECTORS,  IN DETAIL,  BY PORTS

   (1) Extras: a=Auxiliary apparatus; b=telephone from wireless room to bridge; c=two operators; *=three operators.
   (2) Distance obtained by use of table compiled by Dr. L. W. Austin, expert radio telegrapher, Bureau of Steam Engineering, Navy Department, and found at p. 189, Table 9, Manual of Wireless Telegraphy for the Use of Naval Electricians, 1911.
   (3) Approximate distance according to usual range of like apparatus.
   (4) Distance obtained by actual test. In no case have single tests been entered when it seemed that the signaling on that occasion was helped or hindered by atmospheric conditions.
   (5) American vessel.
   (6) British vessel.
   (7) This vessel also in San Francisco table.

DEPARTING  FROM  NEW  YORK.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
American Line (American):
      New York.
      Philadelphia.
      St. Louis.
      St. Paul.
Anchor Line (British):
      Calabria.
      Caledonia.
      California.
      Cameronia.
      Columbia.
      Furnessia.
      Italia.
      Perugia.
Atlantic Transport Line (British):
      Mesaba.
      Minneapolis.
      Minnehaha.
      Minnetonka.
      Minnewaska.
Austro-American Line (Austrian):
      Alice.
      Argentina.
      Atlanta.
      Columbia.
      Eugenia.
      Kaiser Franz Joseph I.
      Laura.
      Martha Washington.
      Oceania.
Bermuda-Atlantic Steamship Co.
   (British):
      Oceana.
Booth Line (British):
      Aidan.
      Cearense.
      Christopher.
      Clement.
      Denis.
      Francis.
      Hilary.
      Hubert.
      Pancras.
      Stephen.
Clyde West India Line (American):
      Cherokee.
      Seminole.
Clyde Line (American):
      Algonquin.
      Apache.
      Arapahoe.
      Comanche.
      Huron.
      Iroquois.
      Mohawk.
Compania Transatlantica (Spanish):
      Alfonso.
      Antonio Lopez.
      Buenos Aires.
      Manuel Calvo.
      Montevideo.
      Montserrat.
      Reina Maria Cristina.
Compagnie Générale Transatlantique
   (French):
      Caroline.
      Chicago.
      Espagne.
      Floride.
      Hudson.
      La Bretagne.
      La France.
      La Lorraine.
      La Provence.
      La Savoie.
      La Touraine.
      Luisiane.
      Mexico.
      Niagara.
      Rochambeau.
      St. Laurent.
      Virginie.
Cunard Line (British):
      Campania.
      Carmania.
      Carpathia.
      Coronia.
      Franconia.
      Ivernia.
      Laconia.
      Lusitania.
      Mauretania.
      Pannonia.
      Saxonia.
      Ultonia.
Fabre Line (French):
      Canada.
      Germania.
      Madonna.
      Roma.
      Sant Anna.
      Venezia.
Hamburg-American Line (German):
      Albingia.
      Allemannia.
      Altai.
      Amerika.
      Batavia.
      Barcelona.
      Bluecher.
      Cincinnati.
      Cleveland.
      Graf Waldersee.
      Hamburg.
      Kaiserin Auguste Victoria.
      Moltke.
      Patricia.
      Pennsylvania.
      Pisa.
      President Grant.
      President Lincoln.
      Pretoria.
      Prinz August Wilheim.
      Prinz Eitel Friedrich.
      Prinz Joachim.
      Prinz Sigismund.
      Sarnia.
      Sibiria.
      Victoria Luise.
      Westerwald.
Hellenic Transatlantic Steam Naviga-
   tion Co. (Ltd.)(Greek):
      Athinai.
      Themistocles.
Holland America Line (Dutch):
      Nieuw Amsterdam.
      Noordam.
      Potsdam.
      Rotterdam.
      Ryndam.
Insular Line (American):
      S. V. Luckenbach.
Italia Società di Navigazione a Vapore
   (Italian):
      Ancona.
      Taormina.
      Verona.
Lamport & Holt (British):
      Byron.
      Tennyson.
      Vasari.
      Verdi.
      Voltaire.
Leyland Line (British):
      Bohemian.
      Californian.
      Winifredian.
Lloyd Brazileiro Steamship Co. (Bra-
   zilian):
      Acre.
      Goyaz.
      Minas Geraes.
      Rio de Janeiro.
      São Paulo.
Lloyd Italiano (Italian):
      Florida.
      Luisiana.
      Virginia.
Lloyd Sabaudo (Italian):
      Principe di Piemonte.
      Re d'Italia.
      Regina d'Italia.
      Tomaso di Savoia.
Maine Steamship Co. (American):
      Bunker Hill.
      Massachusetts.
      North Land.
      North Star.
      Old Colony.
Mallory Line (American):
      Alamo.
      Brazos.
      Comal.
      Concho.
      Denver.
      Lampasas.
      Nueces.
      Rio Grande.
      Sabine.
      San Jacinto.
      San Marcos.
Munson Steamship Line (Cuban):
      Curityba.
      Olinda.
National Steam Navigation Co. of
   Greece (Ltd.)(Greek):
      Macedonia.
      Patris.
Navigazione Generale Italiana (Ital-
   ian):
      Duca d'Aosta.
      Duca Degil Abruzzi.
      Duca di Genova.
      Lazio.
      Sannio.
North German Lloyd (German):
      Barbarossa.
      Berlin.
      Bremen.
      Chemnitz.
      Friedrich der Grosse.
      George Washington.
      Grosser Kurfurst.
      Kaiser Wilhelm II.
      Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse.
      Konig Albert.
      Koningen Luise.
      Kronprinzessin Cecilie.
      Kronprinz Wilhelm.
      Neckar.
      Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm.
      Princess Irene.
New York & Porto Rico Line
   (American):
      Carolina.
      Coamo.
      San Juan.
Old Dominion Steamship Line (Amer-
   ican):
      Hamilton.
      Jamestown.
      Jefferson.
      Madison.
      Monroe.
      Princess Anne.
Ocean Steamship Co. of Savannah
   (American):
      City of Atlanta.
      City of Columbus.
      City of Montgomery.
      City of Savannah.
      City of St. Louis.
      Nacoochee.
Panama Railroad Co. (American):
      Advance.
      Allianca.
      Ancon.
      Colon.
      Cristobal.
      Panama.
Quebec Steamship Co. (British):
      Bermudian.
      Guiana.
      Korona.
      Parima.
      Trinidad.
Red "D" Line (American):
      Caracas.
      Maracaibo.
      Philadelphia.
      Zulia.
Red Cross Line (British):
      Florizel.
      Rosalind.
      Stephano.
Red Star Line (Belgian):
      Finland. 5
      Gothland.
      Kroonland. 5
      Lapland.
      Samland.
      Vaderland.
      Zeeland.
Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. (Brit-
   ish):
      Arcadian.
      Avon.
      Atrato.
      Clyde.
      Magdalena.
      Nile.
      Oratava.
      Oruba.
      Tagus.
      Thames.
      Trent.
Royal West India Mail Line (Dutch):
      Coppename.
      Marowinjne.
      Saramacca.
Russian East Asiatic Steamship Co.
   (Russian):
      Birma (owned).
      Czar.
      Estonia (owned).
      Kursk (owned).
      Lituania (owned).
      Russia (owned).
Southern Pacific Co. (American):
      Antilles.
      Comus.
      Creole.
      Momus.
      Proteus.
Scandinavian-American Line (Dan-
   ish):
      C. F. Tietgen.
      Hellig Olav.
      Oscar II.
      United States.
Sicula-Americana (Italian):
      San Giorgio.
      San Giovanni.
      San Guglielmo.
Trinidad Shipping & Trading Co.
   (British):
      Grenada.
      Maracas.
      Mayaro.
Uranium Steamship Line (British):
      Campanello.
      Uranium.
      Volturno.
United Fruit Co. (British):
      Almirante (owned).
      Carrillo.
      Metapan (owned).
      Santa Marta (owned).
      Sixaola (owned).
      Titives (owned).
      Turrialba.
      Zacapa (owned).
Ward Line (American):
      Antilla.
      Camaguey.
      Esperanza.
      Havana.
      Mexico.
      Monterey.
      Morro Castle.
      Santiago.
      Saratoga.
      Seguranca.
      Vigilancia.
White Star Line (British):
      Adriatic.
      Arabic.
      Baltic.
      Canopic.
      Cedric.
      Celtic.
      Cymric.
      Laurentic.
      Majestic.
      Oceanic.
      Olympic.
      Teutonic.
 
 
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
 
United.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
Marconi.
---
---
Marconi.
    do.
---
---
---
---
---
---
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
---
---
---
---
Telefunken.
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
 
United
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
Marconi.
    do.
Telefunken.
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
De Forest.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Fessenden.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
United.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(2) 450
(2) 450
(2) 220
(3) 150
 
(3) 200
(3) 150
(2) 250
(2) 250
(3) 250
(4) 260
(3) 200
(4) 265
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 200
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
---
---
(3) 150
---
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
 
(3) 300
 
---
(3) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(2) 220
(2) 200
(2) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
(2) 180
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
---
 
 
(3) 150
(2) 160
---
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 200
---
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 200
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 120
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(2) 160
(3) 200
(2) 160
(3) 500
---
---
---
(2) 650
(2) 650
(3) 150
(2) 250
(3) 150
 
---
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 125
(3) 200
(2) 180
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
(2) 550
---
---
(2) 780
---
---
---
---
(4) 115
---
(2) 175
---
(2) 650
---
(2) 300
---
---
---
---
 
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(2) 650
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 200
(3) 150
 
(3) 300
 
 
(2) 460
(3) 500
(3) 500
 
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 500
 
(3) 150
---
(3) 150
 
 
---
(3) 250
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 500
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(2) 240
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(2) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(2) 220
(3) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(2) 220
(2) 190
 
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
 
(3) 200
(3) 150
 
 
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 500
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(2) 750
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(2) 325
(3) 250
---
(2) 500
(2) 600
---
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
 
(3) 200
(2) 200
(3) 200
 
 
(2) 180
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(2) 220
(2) 200
 
 
(2) 180
(3) 200
(2) 250
(2) 200
(2) 220
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
(3) 300
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 300
 
(2) 175
(3) 175
(2) 175
(3) 175
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 140
(2) 250
(3) 150
(3) 150
---
 
 
---
(3) 200
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
 
(3) 300
(2) 500
(3) 300
---
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
(2) 200
(2) 220
(2) 200
(3) 250
(2) 200
 
 
(2) 225
(3) 200
(2) 250
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
(3) 300
(3) 300
---
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 500
(2) 800
(3) 400
(3) 400
---
---
(3) 200
(3) 400
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(2) 200
(2) 280
(3) 200
(2) 240
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
---
(2) 300
---
(3) 200
(2) 240
---
---
(2) 130
(2) 300
(2) 700
(3) 150
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
2.00
2.00
.35
.35
 
1.50
.35
1.50
1.50
1.50
.35
1.50
1.50
 
.35
.35
.35
.35
1.50
 
.35
.35
1.50
1.50
.35
1.50
.35
.35
.35
 
 
2.00
 
---
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
2.00
2.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
---
 
 
.35
.35
---
.35
.35
.35
1.50
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
.35
 
.35
1.50
.35
5.00
---
---
---
1.50
1.50
.35
.35
.35
 
---
.45
.45
.45
1.50
.45
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
1.50
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
.50
 
 
.35
.35
 
1.50
.35
.35
1.50
.35
 
1.00
 
 
5.00
5.00
5.00
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
.35
---
.35
 
 
---
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
2.00
2.00
 
 
1.50
0.35
 
 
5.00
5.00
5.00
.35
.35
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
---
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
---
---
2.00
1.50
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
.35
.35
.35
1.50
.35
.35
----
 
 
---
1.50
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
 
2.00
2.00
---
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
2.50
5.00
2.00
2.00
2.50
2.00
1.00
2.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.50
---
1.50
---
1.50
1.50
---
---
.35
1.50
5.00
.35
 
 
 
a c
a c
a c
a c
 
a
a c
a c
a c
a c
---
a
---
 
a
a c
a c
a c
a c
 
a
---
a
a
---
a b
---
a
---
 
 
---
 
---
---
a
a
a
a
---
a
---
a
 
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
a c
c
a c
a c
a c
c
 
 
a
a c
a c
a
a
a c
a c
a c
a c
a c
a c
---
---
a
a c
a
---
 
a c
a c
a c
a c
a c
a c
a c
a b c
a *
a
a
---
 
c
a
a
a
a c
a
 
---
---
---
---
---
a
a c
a c
a b c
a
a
a b c
a
a c
c
a
c
a
a b
a
---
---
a
---
---
a
a
 
 
---
---
 
a c
a
a
a c
a
 
---
 
 
a c
a c
a
 
---
a
---
a
a
 
a
a
a
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
 
a
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
a
a
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
a
a c
---
a
a
a c
a
a c
a c
a
a
a c
a b
a c
a c
a
 
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
a
---
---
 
 
c
---
c
c
c
c
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
---
a
a
 
a
---
a c
a c
---
a c
a c
 
 
---
---
---
c
c
---
---
c
c
c
c
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
b
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
 
a
a
a c
a
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
a
---
 
a
a
a
 
c
c
c
a c
c
b c
c
c
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
a c
a c
a c
c
a c
a b c
a
a
a c
a c
a c
---
 
 
 
 
7
4
3
3
 
2
5
7
6
6
2
3
2
 
2
3
3
5
3
 
3
---
1
1
---
1
---
2
1
 
 
3
 
1
1
2
4
---
2
---
2
---
1
 
8
9
 
5
7
7
13
12
9
10
 
---
1
---
1
2
1
---
 
 
2
4
1
2
1
5
1
2
3
6
3
---
1
3
7
1
---
 
3
1
3
5
1
1
2
6
4
3
5
---
 
---
6
5
2
2
6
 
8
6
4
3
3
1
1
6
2
1
3
4
3
1
5
1
6
5
1
6
7
2
8
---
3
3
1
 
 
3
2
 
6
4
3
2
4
 
4
 
 
2
3
2
 
4
5
3
3
2
 
2
2
3
 
 
1
---
2
2
2
 
---
3
---
 
3
---
---
---
 
4
3
2
3
1
 
5
7
5
8
8
7
7
7
1
10
6
 
4
6
 
 
1
---
 
 
1
2
1
---
---
 
3
4
3
5
2
3
2
7
3
4
1
5
3
4
6
2
 
 
10
9
6
 
 
8
4
10
17
5
12
 
 
11
4
12
12
9
1
 
8
10
1
7
1
7
 
12
4
6
5
2
 
5
3
8
4
 
2
1
2
 
4
---
6
3
---
6
2
 
 
3
---
2
---
---
---
3
3
1
1
4
 
3
3
7
 
 
7
1
1
5
2
---
 
10
4
6
5
6
 
 
2
2
3
1
 
1
4
1
 
 
1
2
1
 
2
4
2
 
2
3
5
9
2
2
3
4
 
4
3
8
13
6
6
6
3
12
5
5
 
6
2
4
---
3
5
1
3
4
5
5
---
 
 
 
 
KSN
KSM
KSL
KSO
 
MAJ
MAI
MCI
MIO
MOI
MFI
MAR
MAW
 
MMV
MMN
MMA
MMK
MMW
 
MUL
MUG
OKA
OKC
MUU
OCF
MUR
MUW
MUO
 
 
SK
 
MFM
MDA
MDD
MDB
MDE
MDG
MDP
MDH
MDI
MDJ
 
KVK
KVJ
 
KVG
KVA
KVB
KVC
KVH
KVF
KVM
 
MET
MEZ
MJQ
MEU
MJP
MJO
MEP
 
 
MSO
MLY
MSM
MSR
MHS
MLB
IFC
MLL
MLP
MLS
MLT
MHU
MHW
MSQ
MIV
MIJ
MIR
 
MCA
MAA
MPA
MRA
MEA
MIA
IGA
MFA
MGA
MNA
MSA
MTA
 
IFA
MGE
MMB
MRB
MSS
MVZ
 
DAB
DAM
DAA
DDR
DDI
DBA
DDB
DDC
DDV
DDW
DDH
DDA
DDM
DDP
DDN
DDF
DDS
DDI
DDT
DSB
DSI
DSP
DSG
DSM
DSV
DDL
DWE
 
 
MTI
MTH
 
MHB
MHA
MHM
MHR
MHY
 
KCS
 
 
MOA
MOT
MOV
 
UVX
UVY
UVR
UVD
UVL
 
MEL
MWL
MTH
 
 
UJA
UJN
UWN
UWR
UWK
 
MAV
MAM
MAH
 
MRP
MRI
MRG
MRS
 
KJB
KJM
KJD
KJS
KJO
 
KAJ
KAZ
KAM
KAC
KAD
KAD
KAH
KAG
KAB
KAS
KAK
 
MJU
MJT
 
 
MDT
MPT
 
 
MAD
MAO
MAE
MRZ
MRF
 
DKS
DKB
DBR
DCZ
DKD
DKN
DKG
DKM
DKW
DKO
DKL
DKA
DKP
DKK
DKF
DKE
 
 
KCB
KCA
KCJ
 
 
KOA
KOC
KOD
KOG
KOM
KOB
 
 
KFB
KFA
KFY
KFK
KFX
KFP
 
KMV
KMA
KMS
KMX
KMD
KMH
 
BA
BG
BN
BQ
BD
 
KDB
KDM
KDA
KDZ
 
MZL
MZR
MDY
 
MFD
MHD
MKD
MJD
MYD
MFO
MZD
 
 
MJR
MBO
RNA
RNK
RND
RNJ
RNV
RNU
RNS
RNM
RNR
 
UDC
UDW
UDK
 
 
SBA
---
SEA
SRK
SLA
SRN
 
KKA
KKD
KKR
KKM
KKP
 
 
DCF
DHO
DOR
DUS
 
MSH
MSI
MTF
 
 
MFY
MFZ
MFR
 
MGU
MWU
MVU
 
UFN
UFG
UFR
UFY
UFX
UFI
UFK
FUZ
 
WP
WU
KWZ
KWH
KWX
KWY
KWC
WO
KWS
KWG
KWV
 
MHC
MFC
MBC
MPC
MDC
MLC
MGC
MIC
MMC
MOC
MKC
MTC

DEPARTING  FROM  BOSTON.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Allan Line (British):
      Numidian.
      Parisian.
American Mail Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Admiral Dewey.
Cunard Line (British):
      Franconia.
      Ivernia.
Dominion Atlantic Ry. Line (British):
      Boston.
      Prince Arthur.
      Prince George.
Eastern Steamship Co. (American):
      Calvin Austin.
      Governor Cobb.
      Governor Dingley.
Leyland Line (British):
      Bohemian.
      Canadian.
      Cestrian.
      Devonian.
      Pavonian.
      Winifredian.
Maine Steamship Co. (American):
      Northland.
      Massachusetts.
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Gloucester.
      Grecian.
      Howard.
      Indian.
      Juniata.
      Kershaw.
      Nantucket.
      Ontario.
      Persian.
      Quantico.
Ocean Steamship Co. of Savannah
   (American):
      City of Augusta.
      City of Macon.
      City of Memphis.
      Nacoochee.
Plant Line (British):
      A. W. Perry.
      Halifax.
Red Star Line (British):
      Manitou.
      Marquette.
      Menominee.
United Fruit Co. (British):
      Esparta (owned).
      Limon (owned).
      San Jose (owned).
White Star Line (British):
      Arabic.
      Canopic.
      Cretic.
      Cymric.
      Romanic.
      Zeeland.
 
 
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
 
 
United.
 
Marconi.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
United.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
Fessenden.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
 
(3) 300
 
(3) 250
(3) 100
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 125
(3) 150
(2) 200
(3) 150
 
(3) 200
(2) 200
 
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
 
---
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(2) 200
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
(2) 125
 
(3) 400
(3) 400
(2) 500
 
(2) 160
(3) 250
(2) 300
(3) 150
(3) 250
(3) 150
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
0.35
.35
 
 
2.00
 
1.50
.35
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
.35
.35
.35
.35
---
.35
 
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
---
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
 
.35
.35
.35
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
.60
1.50
2.00
.35
1.50
.35
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
---
---
 
a
a
a
 
---
---
---
 
a
---
a
---
a c
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
 
---
c
---
c
 
---
---
 
a
---
a c
 
---
---
---
 
a c
---
a c
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
---
1
 
 
1
 
---
---
 
1
2
2
 
1
1
1
 
---
---
1
---
1
---
 
1
1
 
 
1
---
---
---
1
---
1
1
1
1
 
 
1
1
---
---
 
1
2
 
---
---
1
 
---
1
1
 
1
---
1
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
MNN
MZH
 
 
KUV
 
MEA
MIA
 
MYT
MYU
MYV
 
KRN
KRB
KRV
 
MEL
MGL
MHL
MDL
---
MFL
 
KJD
KJM
 
 
KQG
KQR
KQH
KQI
KQJ
KQK
KQN
KQO
KQX
KQQ
 
 
---
KFC
KFD
KFP
 
OP
OX
 
MNM
MNQ
MNE
 
UFL
UFU
UFW
 
MFC
MPC
MRC
MGC
MNC
MZD
 

DEPARTING  FROM  PROVIDENCE.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Dorchester.
      Essex.
      Itasca.
      Powhatan.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
KQD
KQE
KQU
KQY

DEPARTING  FROM  PHILADELPHIA.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Allan Line (British):
      Carthagenian.
      Mongolian.
      Pretorian.
American Line (British):
      Dominion.
      Haverford.
      Merion.
American Mail Steamship Co. (Amer-
   ican):
      Admiral Dewey.
      Admiral Farragut.
      Admiral Schley.
Hamburg-American Line (German):
      Barcelona.
      Graf Waldersee.
      Pallanza.
      Prinz Adalbert.
      Prinz Oskar.
      Westerwald.
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Berkshire.
      Frederick.
      Grecian.
      Lexington.
      Indian.
      Persian.
Italia Societa di Navigazione (Italian):
      Ancona.
Red Star Line (British):
      Manitou.
 
 
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Marconi.
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
(3) 300
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
---
 
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 250
(3) 200
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(2) 460
 
(3) 150
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
.50
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
5.00
 
.35
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
 
---
a c
---
---
---
a
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
a c
 
a
 
 
 
 
---
1
---
 
1
---
---
 
 
1
---
---
 
---
2
---
---
1
1
 
 
---
1
1
1
2
2
 
1
 
1
 
 
 
 
MHN
MON
MFN
 
MDF
MJH
MJM
 
 
KUV
KUW
KUX
 
DRA
DDW
DDQ
DDZ
DDO
DWE
 
 
KQB
KQF
KQR
KQL
KQI
KQX
 
MOA
 
MNM
 

DEPARTING  FROM  BALTIMORE.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Cretan.
      Dorchester.
      Essex.
      Glouchester.
      Howard.
      Juniata.
      Kershaw.
      Merrimack.
      Nantucket.
      Ontario.
      Parthian.
      Persian.
      Powhatan.
      Quantico.
      Somerset.
      Suwanee.
North German Lloyd (German):
      Brandenburg.
      Cassel.
      Frankfort.
      Koln.
      Main.
      Rhein.
      Willehad.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
Marconi.
    do.
Marconi and
   Telefunken.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(4) 220
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 200
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 200
(3) 250
(3) 220
(3) 250
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
---
---
---
---
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
---
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
a
a
---
a c
a c
a c
a
 
 
 
 
16
22
19
11
14
13
14
14
11
9
14
2
24
2
17
20
 
2
1
---
1
5
5
2
 
 
 
 
KQC
KQD
KQE
KQG
KQH
KQJ
KQK
KQM
KQN
KQO
KQP
KQX
KQY
KQQ
KQS
KQZ
 
DBG
DCC
DFT
DKC
DKI
DKR
DWH
 

DEPARTING  FROM  NEWPORT  NEWS.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Norway, Mexico & Gulf Steamship Co.
   (Norwegian):
      Noruega.
      Texas.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
2.00
2.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
 
 
URG
UXS
 

DEPARTING  FROM  NORFOLK.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Essex.
      Ontario.
Old Dominion steamship Line (Amer-
   ican):
      Madison.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
 
 
    do.
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 250
 
 
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
a
 
 
 
 
1
1
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KQE
KQO
 
 
KOG
 

DEPARTING  FROM  SAVANNAH.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Ocean Steamship Co. of Savannah
   (American):
      City of Augusta.
      City of Columbus.
      City of Memphis.
      City of St. Louis.
      City of Savannah.
Merchants and Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Berkshire.
      Cretan.
      Frederick.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(2) 220
(2) 220
 
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
 
 
c
---
---
c
c
 
 
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
1
1
1
1
1
 
 
1
1
1
 
 
 
 
KFJ
KFA
KFD
KFX
KFK
 
 
KQB
KQC
KQF
 

DEPARTING  FROM  BRUNSWICK.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Clyde West India Line (American):
      Seminole.
 
 
 
United.
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
2.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KVJ
 

DEPARTING  FROM  JACKSONVILLE.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Clyde Line (American):
      Iroquois.
      Mohawk.
Merchants & Miners' Transportation
   Co. (American):
      Indian.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
 
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(2) 180
 
 
(3) 250
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
1
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KVF
KVM
 
 
KQI
 

DEPARTING  FROM  KNIGHTS  KEY.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Peninsular & Occidental Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Miami.
 
 
 
 
United.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KOZ
 

DEPARTING  FROM  KEY  WEST.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Peninsular & Occidental Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Mascotte.
      Miami.
      Olivette.
Mallory Steamship Line:
      Alamo.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
1
 
 
 
 
KOW
KOZ
KOV
 
KAJ
 

DEPARTING  FROM  TAMPA.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Mallory Line (American):
      Alamo.
 
 
 
United.
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KAJ
 

DEPARTING  FROM  MOBILE.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Mallory Line (American):
      Alamo.
 
 
 
United.
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
KAJ
 

DEPARTING  FROM  NEW  ORLEANS.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Compagnie Générale Transatlantique
   (French):
      Luisiane.
      Californie.
Bluefields Steamship Co. (Norwegian):
      Marietta di Giorgio.
D. B. Penn Steamship Co. (American):
      Morgan.
Leyland Line (British):
      Cestrian.
Navigazione Generale-Italiana (Ital-
   ian):
      Liguria.
Pinillos Iziquierdo & Co. (Spanish):
      Pio IX.
Southern Pacific Co. (American):
      Chalmette.
      Creole.
      Excelsior.
      Momus.
      Proteus.
United Fruit Co. (British):
      Abangarez.
      Atenas (owned).
      Cartago.
      Heredia (owned).
      Parismina (owned).
      Turrialba.
United Fruit Co. (Norwegian):
      Ellis.
      Preston.
Vaccaro Bros. Steamship Co. (Hon-
   duran):
      Joseph Vaccaro.
      Rosina.
Vaccaro Bros. Steamship Co. (British):
      Ceiba.
      Yoro.
 
 
 
---
Marconi.
 
United.
 
Falk-McMahon.
 
Marconi.
 
 
    do.
 
    do.
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
Fessenden.
United.
Fessenden.
    do.
United.
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
---
(3) 200
 
---
 
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
 
 
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
---
(3) 200
---
---
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
(3) 250
(3) 250
 
 
Kilo- 
watts.
  
---
1.50
 
---
 
1.00
 
1.50
 
 
1.50
 
1.50
 
1.00
---
1.00
---
---
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
2.00
2.00
 
 
2.00
2.00
 
2.00
2.00
 
 
 
 
---
a
 
---
 
---
 
---
 
 
---
 
a
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
---
---
 
 
 
 
1
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
 
---
 
1
 
---
1
2
2
1
 
1
1
3
---
3
---
 
1
1
 
 
---
1
 
2
---
 
 
 
 
---
MGH
 
---
 
PM
 
MHL
 
 
MAL
 
MXS
 
KKC
---
KKO
---
---
 
UFE
UFM
UFG
UFH
UFD
UFK
 
UFA
UFB
 
 
TV
TR
 
TB
TC
 

DEPARTING  FROM  GALVESTON.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Booth Line (British):
      Ambrose.
      Anselm.
      Anthony.
      Augustine.
      Denis.
      Hildebrand.
      Lafranc.
      Stephen.
Mallory Steamship Co. (American):
      Colorado.
      San Jacinto.
North German Lloyd (German):
      Breslau.
      Hannover.
      Wittekind.
 
 
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
---
    do.
    do.
---
 
United.
    do.
 
---
Telefunken.
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
---
(3) 200
(3) 200
---
 
(3) 200
---
 
---
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
---
1.50
1.50
---
 
1.00
---
 
---
1.00
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
 
---
---
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
---
1
---
---
1
 
---
2
 
1
---
---
 
 
 
 
MDR
MDK
MAY
MDT
---
MDM
MDS
---
 
KAF
---
 
---
DHV
DWD
 

DEPARTING  FROM  SAN  JUAN.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Compagnie Générale Transatlantique
   (French):
      Carevaille.
      Quebec.
      Montreal.
Hamburg-American Line (German):
      Präsident.
New York & Porto Rico Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Ponce.
Pinillos Izquierdo & Co. (Spanish):
      Balmes.
      Catalina.
      Conde Wifredo.
      Martin Saenz.
 
 
 
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
 
 
United.
 
Marconi.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(3) 200
 
 
(3) 200
 
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
0.50
.50
.50
 
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
---
 
 
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
---
 
 
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
 
MHJ
MII
MHZ
 
DPT
 
 
KCP
 
MIZ
MIS
MYS
MZS
 

DEPARTING  FROM  PORT  TOWNSEND.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Alaska Coast Co. (American):
      Admiral Sampson.
      Bertha.
      Yukon.
Alaska Pacific Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Buckman.
      Watson.
Alaska Steamship Co. (American):
      Alameda.
      Dolphin.
      Dora.
      Jefferson.
      Latouche.
      Northwestern.
      Victoria.
Bank Line (British):
      Kumeric.
      Luceric.
      Orteric.
      Severic.
China Mutual Steamship Co. (British):
      Keenum.
      Ning Chow.
      Oanfa.
      Protesilaus.
E. J. Dodge Co. (American):
      Northwestern.
Great Northern Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Minnesota.
Humboldt Steamship Co. (American):
      Humboldt.
Nippon Yusen Kaisha (Japanese):
      Awa Maru.
 
      Hongkong Maru.
      Inaba Maru.
      Kamakura Maru.
      Kasada Maru.
      Naga Maru.
      Sanuki Maru.
      Shinano Maru.
      Tosa Maru.
      Tamba Maru.
Ocean Steamship Co. (British):
      Antilochus.
      Bellerophon.
      Teucer.
      Titan.
Osaka Shosen Kaisha (Japanese):
      Canada Maru.
 
      Chicago Maru.
      Mexico Maru.
      Panama Maru.
      Seattle Maru.
      Tacoma Maru.
Pacific Coast Co. (American)
      Governor.
      City of Seattle.
Union Steamship Co. of New Zealand
   (British):
      Makura.
      Marama.
Western Alaska Steamship Co. (Amer-
  ican):
      Corwin.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
---
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
---
 
 
United.
 
    do.
 
Japanese
Government.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Telefunken.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Japanese
Government.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
---
---
 
 
United.
    do.
 
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 150
(3) 150
(4) 150
 
 
(4) 325
(4) 350
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
(3) 150
---
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
(3) 600
(3) 600
(3) 600
(3) 600
 
---
 
 
(3) 800
 
(3) 150
 
(3) 800
 
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
 
(3) 100
(3) 100
(3) 100
(3) 100
 
(3) 800
 
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
(3) 800
 
---
---
 
 
(3) 300
(3) 300
 
 
(3) 150
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
---
1.00
1.00
 
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
 
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
 
---
 
 
2.00
 
1.00
 
5.00
 
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
 
.50
.50
.50
.50
 
5.00
 
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
 
---
---
 
 
2.00
2.00
 
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
---
 
 
---
 
---
 
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
1
---
---
---
1
1
1
 
---
1
---
---
 
1
---
---
---
 
1
 
 
---
 
1
 
---
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
1
 
---
---
---
---
 
1
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
1
2
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
WAS
WBR
WBS
 
 
WAB
WAW
 
WAA
WAU
WAH
WAJ
---
WAN
WAD
 
UWB
UWC
UWD
UWE
 
MNK
---
OFA
PRO
 
---
 
 
WMI
 
WHX
 
YAW
 
TTN
YIB
YKM
SKT
YKG
YSK
YSN
YTS
YTB
 
SAS
BRM
STR
TTN
 
SCD
 
SCG
SMX
SPM
STL
STC
 
---
---
 
 
MKU
MKM
 
 
WNN
 

DEPARTING  FROM  SAN  FRANCISCO.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
C. A. Smith Lumber Co. (American):
      Nann Smith.
      Redondo.
C. H. Higgins Steamship Co. (Amer-
   ican):
      Fort Bragg.
C. R. McCormick & Co. (American):
      Klamath.
      Willamette.
      Yosemite.
Estabrook Steamship Co. (American):
      Fifield.
E. J. Dodge Co. (American):
      Northland.
      Vanguard.
Gray & Holt Lumber Co. (American):
      Nome City.
Hicks & Hauptman Co. (American):
      Francis H. Leggett.
      J. B. Stetson.
Independent Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Hanalei.
J. Homer Fritch Co. (American):
      Carlos.
Matson Navigation Co. (American):
      Enterprise.
      Hilonian.
      Honolulan.
      Hyades.
      Lurline.
      Wilhelmina.
North Pacific Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Alliance.
      George W. Elder.
      F. A. Kilburn.
      Roanoke.
      Santa Clara.
Oceanic Steamship Co. (American):
      Mariposa.
      Sierra.
      Sonoma.
      Ventura.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      City of Puebla.
      City of Seattle.
      City of Topeka.
      Governor.
      President.
      Queen.
      Senator.
      Spokane.
      State of California.
      Umatilla.
Pacific Mail Steamship Co. (American):
      Acapulco.
      Aztec.
      China.
      City of Panama.
      City of Para.
      City of Sydney.
      Korea.
      Manchuria.
      Mongolia.
      Newport.
      Nile. 6
      Persia. 6
      San Jose.
      San Juan.
      Siberia.
Pacific Navigation Co. (American):
      Harvard.
      Yale.
Pollard Steamship Co. (American):
      Centralia.
      Coronado.
San Francisco & Portland Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Bear.
      Beaver.
      Kansas City.
      Rose City.
Sudden & Christensen Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Chehalis.
      Norwood.
Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Japanese):
      American Maru.
 
      Chiyo Maru.
      Nippon Maru.
      Shinyo Maru.
      Tenyo Maru.
Union Steamship Co. of New Zealand
   (British):
      Angora.
      Aorangi.
      Maitai.
      Manuka.
Alaska Coast Co. (American):
      Admiral Sampson.
      Yukon.
Alaska Pacific Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Buckman.
      Watson.
Alaska Steamship Co. (American):
      Northwestern.
      Victoria.
Humboldt Steamship Co. (American):
      Humboldt.
 
 
 
 
United.
    do.
 
 
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
 
    do.
 
Marconi.
    do.
United.
---
Marconi.
    do.
 
 
United.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
Massie.
    do.
United.
Massie.
Marconi.
    do.
United.
    do.
    do.
Massie.
United.
    do.
Massie.
    do.
United.
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
    do.
Massie.
 
 
United.
    do.
 
Japanese
Government.
    do.
    do.
    do.
    do.
 
 
Massie.
United.
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
    do.
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 125
(2) 125
 
 
(4) 125
 
(2) 125
(2) 125
(2) 125
 
(4) 200
 
(4) 180
(2) 100
 
(4) 200
 
---
(3) 300
 
 
(4) 250
 
(3) 200
 
(3) 400
---
(4) 1,400
---
(4) 1,600
(4) 1,350
 
 
(3) 150
(4) 200
(4) 160
(4) 215
(2) 125
 
(4) 1,700
(4) 2,275
(2) 250
(2) 250
 
 
(4) 350
(3) 200
(4) 350
(4) 350
(4) 300
(4) 310
(4) 400
---
(4) 400
(4) 800
 
(4) 350
(3) 300
(4) 1,600
(3) 300
---
---
(4) 2,325
(4) 1,950
(4) 1,300
(4) 400
(4) 1,150
(4) 3,300
(2) 200
(2) 400
(4) 2,300
 
(4) 350
(4) 350
 
(4) 250
(4) 200
 
 
(4) 200
(4) 333
(2) 200
(4) 300
 
 
(3) 200
(4) 400
 
(3) 1,000
 
(4) 1,850
(4) 1,250
(4) 1,525
(4) 1,375
 
 
(2) 200
(4) 1,600
(4) 1,100
(4) 1,300
 
(3) 150
(4) 150
 
 
(4) 325
(4) 350
 
(3) 150
(3) 150
 
(3) 150
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
 
1.00
---
 
1.00
 
---
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
1.00
 
---
---
3.00
---
---
---
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
 
2.00
2.00
---
---
 
 
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
---
1.00
2.00
 
2.00
2.00
5.00
2.00
---
---
5.00
5.00
5.00
3.00
---
5.00
2.00
2.00
5.00
 
2.00
2.00
 
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
---
3.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
 
5.00
 
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
 
 
---
2.00
2.00
---
 
1.00
1.00
 
 
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
1.00
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
---
---
---
 
---
 
---
---
 
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
 
---
 
a
---
 
---
a
a
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
 
---
---
a
---
a
a
a
a
a
---
---
---
---
---
a
 
---
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
---
 
a
---
---
---
 
 
a
---
---
---
 
---
---
 
 
---
---
 
---
---
 
---
 
 
 
 
---
22
 
 
16
 
15
10
16
 
16
 
16
1
 
12
 
2
12
 
 
27
 
9
 
5
---
5
  ---
11
8
 
 
1
27
14
25
18
 
3
12
2
1
 
 
16
3
29
17
23
24
4
1
22
18
 
5
---
5
6
6
4
4
2
5
5
2
4
3
5
4
 
17
20
 
21
16
 
 
22
19
4
25
 
 
17
24
 
1
 
5
2
4
4
 
 
2
3
4
2
 
4
10
 
 
17
16
 
1
1
 
1
 
 
 
 
WBO
WBM
 
 
WST
 
WSX
WSW
WSY
 
WRF
 
WNX
WNZ
 
WRN
 
WSB
WSC
 
 
WHN
 
WNC
 
WMN
WMM
WKH
WMK
WML
WMO
 
 
WRV
WRT
WRU
WRR
WRS
 
WHK
WHJ
WHI
WHL
 
 
WGQ
WGA
WGY
WGV
WGW
WGX
WGS
WGE
WGL
WGU
 
WWO
WWQ
WWA
WWP
WWF
WWG
WWK
WWE
WWN
WWH
---
---
WWL
WWM
WWU
 
WRH
WRY
 
WSN
WSO
 
 
WWD
WWB
WWS
WWR
 
 
WSH
WSG
 
TMC
 
TGY
TNP
YSN
TTY
 
 
IJV
MGA
MYQ
USC
 
WAS
WBS
 
 
WAB
WAW
 
WAN
WAD
 
WHX
 

DEPARTING  FROM  PORTLAND,  OREG.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
Portland & Coos Bay Steamship
   Co. (American):
      Breakwater.
North Pacific Steamship Co. (Ameri-
   can):
      Alliance. 7
 
 
 
 
United.
 
 
    do.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 200
 
 
(3) 200
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
1.00
 
 
1.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
WBK
 
 
WRV
 

DEPARTING  FROM  HONOLULU.

Name of line and vessel.System.Range.Power.Extras. 1Times in-
spected.
Call
letters.
 
 
Australian Royal Mail (British):
      Zealandia.
 
 
 
 
Massie.
 
 
Nautical
miles.
  
(3) 500
 
 
Kilo- 
watts
.
2.00
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
---
 
 
 
 
MCA
 


4.  DEPARTURE OF VESSELS SUBJECT TO THE ACTS OF JUNE 24, 1910, AND JULY 23, 1912, BY PORTS.

SEABOARD.

Port.Passenger vessels.Cargo vessels.Grand
total.
American.Foreign.Total.American.Foreign.Total.
Belfast.
Portland, Me.
Boston.
Fall River.
Providence.
New York.
Philadelphia.
Baltimore.
Newport News.
Norfolk.
Savannah.
Charleston.
Brunswick.
Jacksonville.
Key West.
Tampa.
San Juan, P. R.
Mobile.
New Orleans.
Galveston.
Los Angeles.
San Francisco.
Eureka.
Honolulu, Hawaii.   
Astoria.
Portland, Oreg.
Port Townsend.
Juneau, Alaska.
 
         Total.
 
2
19
62
31
10
157
27
40
2
58
46
27
3
35
23
21
22
4
15
9
72
123
15
11
16
16
30
50
___
946
 
---
---
48
---
2
123
14
5
---
3
7
---
---
---
---
---
6
---
13
4
---
4
---
8
---
---
16
8
___
261
 
2
19
110
31
12
280
41
45
2
61
53
27
3
35
23
24
28
4
28
13
72
127
15
19
16
16
46
58
___
1,207
 
---
---
---
---
---
12
---
---
---
54
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
---
11
---
---
---
23
---
---
---
---
___
100
 
---
---
9
---
---
16
2
4
---
6
---
---
---
---
6
3
---
---
4
1
---
4
1
11
---
---
---
---
___
67
 
---
---
9
---
---
28
2
4
---
60
---
---
---
---
6
3
---
---
4
12
---
4
1
34
---
---
---
---
___
167
 
2
19
119
31
12
308
43
49
2
121
53
27
3
35
29
24
28
4
32
25
72
131
16
53
16
16
46
58
___
1,374
 

GREAT  LAKES.

Port.American
vessels.
Foreign
vessels.
Total.   Port.American
vessels.
Foreign
vessels.
Total.
Buffalo.
Erie.
Duluth.
Milwaukee.
Grand Haven. 1 
Port Huron.
 
31
9
13
4
27
7
 
---
---
9
---
---
---
 
31
9
22
4
27
7
 
Detroit.
Marquette.
Chicago.
Cleveland.
 
         Total.
 
31
78
4
14
___
218
 
---
92
---
---
___
101
 
31
170
4
14
___
319
 
1 Reported from subport of St. Ignace on northern peninsula.


5.  SUMMARY OF THE DEPARTURE OF VESSELS SUBJECT TO THE ACTS OF JUNE 24, 1910, AND JULY 23, 1912, BY DISTRICTS.

District.Passenger vessels.Cargo vessels.Grand
total.
American.Foreign.Total.American.Foreign.Total.
First.
Second.
Third.
Fourth.
Fifth.
Sixth.
Seventh.
Eighth.
Ninth.
 
        Total.
 
124
157
127
177
28
221
112
92
126
___
1,164
 
50
123
22
13
17
12
24
---
101
___
362
 
174
280
149
190
45
233
136
92
227
___
1,526
 
---
12
54
---
11
23
---
---
---
___
100
 
9
16
12
9
5
16
---
---
---
___
67
 
9
28
66
9
16
39
---
---
---
___
167
 
183
308
215
199
61
272
136
92
227
___
1,693