The Ondophone, a miniaturized crystal detector sold by Horace Hurm, was one of the first radio receivers offered for sale to the general public. It was mainly promoted for use around Paris, France, for receiving daily time signals broadcast by the Eiffel Tower radio station. (Apparently the Ondophone didn't have any tuning, so it would have picked up all nearby radio signals). At this time the Eiffel Tower station used a transmitter which could only transmit dots and dashes, so the time signals were sent as standardized sequences, reminiscent of the hourly tolling of church bells. This report also mentions receiving weather reports, which were transmitted in Morse Code.
 
Electrical Review and Western Electrician, April 11, 1914, page 745: Ondophone

Vest-Pocket  Wireless  Receiving  Instrument.
 
    The large wireless stations, such as the Eiffel Tower in Paris, are now sending out time signals very regularly each day, and even weather signals, but up to the present the need of a more or less complicated receiver has prevented the general public taking advantage of these signals on as large a scale as is hoped for in the future. What remained to be done was to devise a small instrument like the Ondophone illustrated herewith, which can be carried even in the vest pocket and is entirely self-contained. No battery or extra apparatus is needed in order to hear the signals by the use of the combined crystal detector and telephone.
    An open umbrella makes a good enough antenna when within 30 miles of Paris, and all that is done is to connect one of the metal clips through a flexible cord to the umbrella and connect the second clip to the ground. With a larger metal object, such as a bicycle or automobile, the signals can be heard as far as 120 miles from the Eiffel Tower, so that the tourist can stop anywhere out on the road in order to ascertain the exact time and set his watch. Other metal objects, such as a stove, wire fence or grating, bedstead and the like can be used, and for long distances, such as 300 miles, a good plan is to use a telephone circuit as an antenna, by connecting on to any existing telephone apparatus. Within the city of Paris, a double antenna wire of 80 feet mounted on the roof allows of hearing the German and English wireless stations, even though numberless zinc roofs are in the way.