An original scan for this article is located at: http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1914-05-31/ed-1/seq-25/
 
Oregonian, May 31, 1914, Section 2, page 7:

WIRELESS  'PHONE  USED
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WANAMAKER  EMPLOYE  GETS  FIRST  MESSAGE  ON  LINE.
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Philadelphia  and  New  York  Store  Connected  for  Transaction  of  Daily  Business.
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    NEW YORK, May 25.--"Mrs. Gray Factory B," will go down in history as the first woman to whom a message was transmitted by the human voice, via wireless, over a distance of nearly 100 miles.
    No one in the Marconi wireless station in the Wanamaker store knows "Mrs. Gray, Factory B." Nevertheless "Mrs. Gray, Factory B," was instructed to "send sketch on order 9833 in to-night's case." This was the first commercial message to be sent between the New York and Philadelphia stores by the human voice, instead of by the familiar dot and dash system.
    R. Crane, wireless operator of the Marconi station on the roof of the new Wanamaker store building, was the first man whose voice ever flitted through pretty nearly 100 miles of space without even a slender wire to guide it, and found its proper destination in the ear of Thomas Appleby, the wireless operator at Philadelphia.
    The Marconi engineers, F. A. Hart and H. Ernest Campbell, have been experimenting for months on the task of transmitting the human voice by wireless. The greatest distance ever set at naught heretofore by the combination of the voice and the wireless was little more than 15 miles. Music was played at the New York station and the selection was heard, identified, and even enjoyed, by the Philadelphia operator.
    A telephone message from New York was also received by the steamer Antilles, of the Morgan line, which was 55 miles out to sea, and the steamer North Sea, 60 miles at sea, received a second vocal message.
    In sending their telephone messages by wireless the operators use an ordinary telephone receiver and speak in the normal tone of voice. The Philadelphia station has not yet been equipped with a transmitting instrument for sending voice messages by wireless.
    "When the Philadelphia station is properly equipped," predicts Operator Crane, "we shall conduct daily business by wireless telephone. We're trying to get into communication with Philadelphia today, but have to wait for the clearing of storm areas."