Brown's Signalling, 18th Edition, February, 1916, pages 9-28:

THE  INTERNATIONAL  CODE  OF  SIGNALS

FOR   THE   USE   OF   ALL   NATIONS.
____________

Hints  to  Candidates  for  Certificates  of  Competency  at  Board  of  Trade  Examinations.
______

THE EXAMINATION as to the New International Code of Signals will tend to elicit whether the Candidate possesses--
1st.--A knowledge of the distinctive features of the Code.
2nd.--The power of making and interpreting with facility Signals made with Flags.
3rd.--The power of interpreting Signals made by the Semaphore, and by Shapes as for Distant Signals.
4th.--The power of communicating and interpreting Signals by the Morse Code--either by Flashing a Light, Blasts of Sound, or by Flag Waving.

Note.--The Flags of the New International Code are given in Colour
    The Examination will be a practical one, by means of the Signal Book, Flags, and Models, with which the Examiners are furnished.
    The Candidate, to enable him to master the important points which he might be called upon to answer, should be familiar with the following:--

SPECIAL  FLAGS  OF  THE  INTERNATIONAL  CODE.
__________

    A short description of the special flags of the International Code is hereby given and the candidate should be careful to remember their meanings, as the examiner may request a description of the flags and their special significations without allowing the candidate to see them.
    A is a burgee, one of the only two burgees that exist in the International Code. It is White and Blue, divided vertically. The White half is next to the mast (or at the hoist), the Blue half is at the fly, which is swallow tailed. A hoisted as a special signal denotes that it is flown from one of H.M. ships when on full speed trials.
    B like A is a burgee; it is all Red and is used as a "powder" flag by vessels having explosives on board.
    C is a white pennant with a red ball in the centre. Hoisted singly it is an "affirmative" flag and denotes "Yes."
    D is a Blue pennant with a white ball in the centre and is a "negative" flag. When hoisted singly it denotes "No."
    E is also a pennant of three colours, Red at the hoist, White in the centre and Blue at the fly. If E alone is hoisted at the masthead and the flag J in any position inferior to it, it denotes when a British merchant vessel desires to exercise semaphore signalling with one of H.M. ships or another British merchant vessel. If E is hoisted under the Red Ensign and J in any position inferior to it, it means that one of H.M. ships wishes to answer semaphore signalling with a British merchant vessel. If a man-of-war is willing to exercise semaphore signalling, E may be hoisted under the Red Ensign, together with the Answering pennant at the top and close up when ready to take in exercise. If a merchant ship is willing to exercise, E may be hoisted where best seen and the necessary pennant at the top close up when ready to exercise.
    F is a Red pennant with a White St. George's Cross. Hoisted on ships of H.M. fleet, it denotes Guardship No. 2.
    G is a Yellow and Blue pendant, Yellow at the hoist and Blue at the fly. Hoisted with code flag on top, it denotes Alphabetical Signal No. 3.
    H is the first Square flag of the alphabet; it is white and red divided vertically, the White at the hoist and the Red at the fly. Hoisted with code flag on top signifies "I wish to communicate."
    I is a square Yellow flag with a Black ball in the centre. Hoisted singly denotes "I have not a clean bill of health."
    J is a square flag of Blue, White and Blue, divided horizontally (White stripe in centre). Hoisted with code flag on top it denotes "I have head way." When used in the Royal Navy and flown singly it is the Semaphore flag.
    K is a square flag, Yellow and Blue divided vertically. Yellow at the hoist, Blue at the fly. Hoisted with code flag on top, it denotes "I have stern way."
    L is a square flag, Yellow and Black quartered. Yellow at the upper hoist, Yellow at Lower fly. Flown separately, it is used to denote, "I have or had some dangerous, infectious disease on board."
    M is a square Blue flag with a White St. Andrew's Cross. Flown with code flag on top, it denotes "Numeral Signal No. 1." Flown separately on one of H.M. ships, it denotes "Medical Guard."
    N is a square Blue and White chequered flag. It has sixteen squares, the square in the upper hoist and lower fly being Blue. Flown with code flag on top, it denotes "Numeral Signal No. 2."
    O is a square flag, Yellow and Red divided diagonally. Yellow at hoist and Red at fly. Hoisted with code flag on top it denotes "Numeral Signal No. 3."
    P is a square Blue flag with a White square in centre. Hoisted separately, it is known as the Departure flag and indicates that the vessel hoisting it is about to sail.
    Q is a square Yellow flag. In foreign waters flown separately, it is hoisted on quarantine hospitals. Hoisted when entering ports it denotes "I have a clean bill of health, but am liable to quarantine."
    R is a square Red flag with a yellow St. George's Cross. Hoisted with code flag on top signifies "Do not pass ahead of me."
    S is a square White flag with a Blue square in centre. Hoisted separately, it is the International Signal for a Pilot.
    T is a square tricolour flag, Red, White and Blue, Red at hoist, Blue at fly. Hoisted with code flag on top, it denotes "Do not overtake me."
    U is a square Red and White quartered flag, Red at upper hoist and at Lower fly. Hoisted with code flag on top it indicates "My engines are stopped."
    V is a square White flag with a Red St. Andrew's Cross. Hoisted with code flag on top, it indicates "My engines are going full speed astern."
    W is a White flag with a Blue Border, Red square in centre. Hoisted with code flag on top indicates "All boats return to the ship." N.B.--This flag hoisted separately at ports abroad is extensively used by ships to indicate when fresh water is required.
    X is a square White flag with a Blue St. George's Cross. Hoisted with code flag on top indicates "I will pass ahead of you."
    Y is a square flag with five Yellow bars intersected with five Red bars diagonally placed. Yellow at upper hoist, Red at lower fly. Hoisted with code flag on top indicates, "All ships of convoy are to rejoin company."
    Z is a square Black, Yellow, Blue and Red flag, quartered diagonally. Black at mast, Blue at fly, Yellow at top, Red at bottom. Hoisted with code flag on top, it indicates "I will pass astern of you."
    The Answering pennant. Red and white stripes vertically placed, Red at hoist, Red at fly. The Red flag is intersected by the two White vertical portions. Hoisted separately it is used as an Answering pennant, as a code flag it is used under the Ensign.
    Pilot Jack. A square Union Jack with a White border. It is used separately as a pilot signal or on the chart staff of a merchant ship when anchored.
Remarks  on  the  International  Signal  Code  Flags.

    There are two burgees in the code, A and B. Burgees are swallow-tailed flags.
    There are six pennants (including the Answering pennant) in the code.
    Three of the square flags contain Black, the I, the L, and the Z. Nine of the square flags contain Red, the H, the O, the R, the T, the U, the V, the W, the V and the Z.
    Eight of the square flags contain Yellow, the G, the K, the L, the O, the Q, the R, the Y, and the Z.
    Two square flags of the code contain St. Andrew's Cross, the M and the V.
    Three flags of the code contain St. George's Cross, the F (pendant) and the square flags R and X.
    Three of the flags have squares in centre, the P, the S, and the W.
    Three of the flags have balls in the centre, the pennants C, the D, and the square flag I.
    Three of the square flags are chequered, the L, the N, and the U. Two of the flags are tricolours, the pennant E, and the square flag T.
    C may be termed the White pennant.
    D the Blue pennant.
    E the tricolour.
    F the fiery pennant.
    G the Yellow pennant.

    The first step to be taken by one who desires to learn signalling is to thoroughly study the code flags and their significations.

HOW  THE  INTERNATIONAL  SIGNAL  BOOK  IS  ARRANGED.
_______________

    In opening the New International Code Book you are assisted in putting the pages in the best position for reference, by throwing over the leaves to one side or the other by the broad green band. The book from the centre, being indiced throughout for ready reference, on the left side you have in the order named after the coloured flag sheets, and other explanatory matter.
1.--Signals by one Flag for vessels Towing and being Towed.
2.--Urgent and Important Signals by Code Flag over any one Flag.
3.--Urgent and Important Signals by any Two Flags AB to ZY
4.--Compass Signals by Three Flags ABC to AST
5.--Monies of the World Signals by Three Flags ASU to AVJ
6.--Weights and Measures of the World Signals by Three Flags AVK to BCN
7.--Decimals and Fractions Signals by Three Flags BCO to BDZ
8. -Auxiliary Phrases Signals by Three Flags BEA to CWT
9.--General Vocabulary Signals by Three Flags CXA to SKZ

-------Here is the Centre of the Signal Book.-------

And on the right side you have the remainder of General Vocabulary Signals by Three Flags from SLA to ZNP
10.--Latitude and Longitude Signals by Code Flag over Two Flags AB to KP
11.--Divisions of Time (h.m.s.) Signals by Code Flag over Two Flags KQ to QL
12.--Barometer Signals by Code Flag over Two Flags QM to TS
13.--Thermometer Signals by Code Flag over Two Flags TU to ZV
14.--Numeral Table Signals by Code Flag under Two Flags UA to ZY
15.--Geographical Signals by any Four Flags ABCD to BFAU
16.--Alphabetical Spelling Table Signals by any Four Flags CBDF to CZYX

THE  CODE  FLAG  IS  THE  ANSWERING  PENNANT.
___________

    When used as the "Code Flag" it is hoisted under the Ensign at the Peak; when used as the "Answering Pennant" it is hoisted at the Foretop, or where best seen.

Resume  of  the  Different  Hoists  Required

SIGNALS  MADE  BY  ONE  FLAG

    Are shown by hand, just over the gunwale, and are used only by vessels towing and being towed.

SIGNALS  MADE  BY  TWO  FLAGS

    Are Urgent and Important Signals (1*), either made by Code Flag over one flag or by combinations of any two flags AB to ZY.
    There are also in Alphabetical Spelling Signals, signals made by one, two, three or four flags as explained on page 24 where the Code Flag is hoisted over E, F, or G. The same applies to Numeral Signals as explained on page 25 where the Code Flag is hoisted over M, N, or O.

SIGNALS  MADE  BY  THREE  FLAGS.

Code flag over Two Flags AB to DH, Latitude Signals (2*)
Code flag over Two Flags DI to KP, Longitude Signals (2*)
Code flag over Two Flags KQ to QL, Time (H.M.S.) Signals (2*)
Code flag over Two Flags QM to TS, Barometer Signals (2*)
Code flag over Two Flags TU to ZV, Thermometer Signals (2*)
Code flag under Two Flags UA to ZY, Numeral Signals (2*)
                                         Also Signals
By any Three Flags, ABC to AST are Compass Signals (3*)
By any Three Flags, ASU to AVJ are Money Signals (4*)
By any Three Flags, AVK to BCN are Measures and Weights Signals (4*)
By any Three Flags, BCO to BDZ are Decimals and Fractions Signals (4*)
By any Three Flags, BEA to CWT are Auxiliary Phrases (5*)
By any Three Flags, CXA to ZNP are General Vocabulary (6*)
    1*--Urgent Signals imply attention or demand--as DS, "Pay attention," NM, "I am on fire," &c. They relate to "Distress," "Danger," "Directions to a vessel under way," "Caution," &c. They are consequently of the utmost importance, and should never be neglected.
    2*--Signals having the Code Flag either over or under Two Flags are Special Signals, and must be given or read from the part of the Code Book under the separate Heads or Sections.
    3*--Compass Signals are given in Degrees (the most precise method), also in Points and Half Points. When given in Degrees they are to be understood as being Magnetic Bearings, i.e., Compass Bearings corrected for the local attraction due to the vessel (deviation).
    When given in Points or Half Points, they are to be understood as being Compass Bearings, i.e., Bearings as shown by the Compass, and uncorrected for either deviation or variation. True Bearings are Compass Bearings corrected for deviation and variation.
    4*--Money, Weights and Measures, Decimals and Fractions, have Special Signals devoted to them, and are only to be given and read from their respective sections.
    5*--Auxiliary Phrases, i.e., Phrases containing the Auxiliary Verbs, or forming sentences or parts of sentences in frequent use, these may be more readily consulted in this part of Code Book when making a Signal, but all are given fully in the General Vocabulary.
    6*--General Vocabulary.--This is the index to most of the Signalling required in general practice, and to which chief reference is made when making a Signal. It embraces Urgent and Important Signals, also Auxiliary Phrases. This part, as in all the others, being in alphabetical order, you have first to determine the subject of your Signal--such as "Cargo," "Leak," "Wreck," "Enemy," "War," &c., and open the Signal Book at that word, and all possible renderings of it are conveniently arranged from which to select the Signal that suits the occasion.


SIGNALS  MADE  BY  FOUR  FLAGS.

Any 

Combination from ABCD to BFAU are Geographical Signals. (7*)
Any Combination from CBDF to CZYX are Alphabetical Spelling Table Signals. (8*)
Any Combination with Flag G uppermost are names of Men-of-War. Any Combination from HBCD and succeeding letters of alphabet are names of Merchant vessels. These two last are found in the Supplement to Code Book.
    There are no two Signal Hoists of same character in the Code Book, the alphabet being repeated with different combinations of letters from A to Z singly, and also combined with the Code Flag (Urgent and Important Signals); then there are Signals of a combination of two flags of the Code, or with the Code Flag either above or below any two flags of the Code. Three Flag Signals beginning with Compass, Money, &c., also run through the alphabet from ABC to ZNP.
    Four Flag Signals, when signalling from the Code Book, are only used for
Geographical Signals when the Burgess A or B is uppermost.
Alphabetical Spelling Signals when the Pennant C is uppermost.
    The only other four Flag Signals used at sea are for Names of Men-of-War when the Pennant G is uppermost; or Names of Merchant Ships when flag H or any succeeding letter is uppermost and which forms the Ship's Distinguishing Signal.
    The last two Signals, "Names of Men - of - War," and of "Merchant Ships," are to be found in the "Supplement to Code Book," and in the "Mercantile Navy List."
FOUR  FLAG  SIGNALS.
    7*--In addition to the Distinguishing Signal (i.e., Ship's Signal) of vessels, which has flag H or any other succeeding letter of alphabet uppermost, and the names of Men-of-War which have Pennant G uppermost, there are only two kinds of Signals having four flags in the International Code Book; these are the Geographical Signals which have Burgees A or B uppermost, and Spelling Table Signals, which have Pennant C uppermost.
    8*--Alphabetical Spelling Table.--This table can be used in communications between vessels of all countries employing the Roman characters A, B, C, &c. An alternative system of making Alphabetical Signals is explained at page 23.


    Suppose the examiner makes a hoist. The candidate must, from the form of the hoist and the flag which is uppermost, be able to explain the nature of the signal indicated. Or, the examiner may desire the candidate to make a hoist as--"Hoist a Compass Signal," "Hoist a Latitude Signal," "Hoist an Urgent Signal," etc. In either case, if the candidate is thoroughly acquainted with the letters, or rather signs, which form the hoist of these signals enumerated on pages 13, 14, and 19 marked (1*) to (8*) he cannot fail to make the required hoist, or to interpret any signal made, whichever may be required of him. A plate is given (No. IV.) illustrating the several hoists of two, three, and four flags. As an exercise a candidate can put on paper any similar signals from the different sections, which he can choose for himself, and compare them with the hoists which are given on Plate IV.
______________

INSTRUCTIONS  HOW  TO  SIGNAL.
_______

    In the following instructions the ship making the signal is called "A"; the ship signalled to is called "B."
_______

HOW  TO  MAKE  A  SIGNAL.

1.--

Ship "A," wishing to make a signal, hoists her Ensign with the Code Flag under it.
2.--If more than one vessel or signal station is in sight, and the signal is intended for a particular vessel or signal station, ship "A" should indicate which vessel or signal station she is addressing by making the distinguishing signal (i.e., the signal letters) of the vessel or station with which she desires to communicate.
3.--If the distinguishing signal is not known ship "A" should make use of one of the signals, DI to DQ (page 32).
4.--When ship "A" has been answered by the vessel she is addressing (see paragraph 9) she hoists her own distinguishing signal (signal letters) and then proceeds with the signal which she desires to make, first hauling down her Code Flag if it is required for making the signal.
5.--Signals should always be hoisted where they can best be seen, and not necessarily at the masthead.
6.--Each hoist should be kept flying until ship "B" hoists her Answering Pennant "Close up" (see paragraph 10).
7.--When ship "A" has finished signalling she hauls down her Ensign and her Code Flag, if the latter has not already been hauled down (see paragraph 4).
8.--When it is desired to make a signal it should be looked out in the General Vocabulary.

HOW  TO  ANSWER  A  SIGNAL.

9.--

Ship "B" (the ship signalled to), on seeing the signal made by ship "A," hoists her Answering Pennant at the "Dip."
    (A flag is at the "Dip" when it is hoisted about two-thirds of the way up, that is, some little distance below where it would be when hoisted close up.)
    The Answering Pennant should always be hoisted where it can best be seen.
10.--When "A's" hoist has been taken in, looked out in the Signal Book, and is understood, "B" hoists her Answering Pennant "Close up" and keeps it there until "A" hauls her hoist down.
11.--"B" then lowers her Answering Pennant to the "Dip," and waits for the next hoist.
12.--If the flags in "A's" hoist cannot be made out, or if, when the flags are made out, the purport of the signal is not understood, "B" keeps her Answering Pennant at the "Dip," and hoists the signal OWL or WCX or such other signal as may meet the case, and when "A" has repeated or rectified her signal, and "B" thoroughly understands it, "B" hoists her Answering Pennant "Close up."
______________

NOTES  ON  SIGNALLING.
_______

    1. PLURALS.--To facilitate the translation of the Code into foreign languages the plurals of words given in the Signal Book have been omitted. The words should be regarded as being used in the singular, unless the contrary is indicated by the context.
    2. WHEN  MAKING  SIGNALS  FOR  COMPARING  CHRONOMETERS (page 51) OR  SHOWING  THE  MEAN  TIME.--Vessel "A" is to hoist the signal denoting the hour, and shortly after the signal has been answered by "B" dip it sharply to denote the precise instant used for comparison. The signals denoting the minutes and seconds shown by the chronometer at the instant of dipping are then to be hoisted. To ensure accuracy a second comparison should be made.
    3. IN  SIGNALLING  THE  LONGITUDE  OR  THE  TIME.--Vessels should always reckon from the meridian of Greenwich, except French vessels, which will use the meridian of Paris. If any doubt is entertained the vessel to whom the signal is made should hoist NBL--What is your first meridian?
    4. MERIDIANS.--The British meridian is Greenwich 0h. 0m. 0s. The meridian of Paris (Observatory) is 2° 20' 15" east of Greenwich, or 0h. 9m. 21s. The meridian of Cadiz (San Fernando Observatory) is 6° 12' 24" west of Greenwich, or 0h. 24m. 49·6s.
    5. PASSING  VESSELS.--Ships passing one another or signal stations will do well to hoist the following signals in the order shown:--
    (1) National Colours with the Code Signal under them. (The Ensign should be kept flying until all communication is ended; the Code Flag may be hauled down if it is required for making a signal.)
    (2) Ship's name (signal letters).
    (3) Where from.
    (4) Where bound.
    (5) Number of days out.
    (6) My longitude by chronometer is.
    The Ensign should be dipped and rehoisted as a farewell.
    When vessels are passing each other quickly time will be saved if instead of hoisting the Answering Pennant they exchange signals in the following manner:--
    On reading "A's" name (that is, distinguishing signal) "B" should hoist hers. "A" should not haul down until she understands "B's" hoist, when both ships should haul down together, and proceed in the order suggested above.
    6. DISTINGUISHING  SIGNALS (Signal letters).--It is the custom on board some ships to keep the flags of their distinguishing signal bent together. If this is done a toggle or some other mark should be used to prevent the flags being bent on and hoisted upside down.
    7. PROCEDURE  WHEN  SIGNALLING  NAMES  AND  ADDRESSES.--The following course is to be followed when making a signal which contains the ship's name and the owners' name and address. Ship "A" wishing to obtain orders from her owner will make--
    1. Her distinguishing signal (signal letters).
    2. The signal SW--"I wish to obtain orders from my owner, Mr. ---- at ----."
    3. The owner's name spelling it letter by letter, or by using the Alphabetical Spelling Table.
    4. The owner's address spelling it letter by letter, or by using the Alphabetical Spelling Table. Signals from the Geographical Table can also be used in some cases. Figures can be made by Numeral Signals or by the Numeral Table.
    Example:--Ship "A" wishes to get orders from her owner (say) "Mr. C. Thorold, at 256 Lombard Street, London."
    Having hoisted her National Colours with the Code Signal under them she makes the following signals:
 
  1st Hoist--Her distinguishing signal (signal letters.)
  2nd   "SW = "I wish to obtain orders from my owner, Mr. ----, at ----."
  3rd    "Code Flag over E = The signals which follow are alphabetical. (Before this signal is made the Code Flag under the Signals may be hauled down.)
  4th    "C = C.
  5th    "Code Flag over F = Dot between initials.
  6th    "THOR} = "Thorold."
  7th    "OLD
  8th    "Code Flag over M = The signal which follows is a numeral signal, and is to be looked at in the Numeral Table.
  9th    "BEF = "256."
10th    "Code Flag over E = The signals which follow are alphabetical.
11th    "LOMB} = "Lombard."
12th    "ARD
13th    "Code Flag over G = the Alphabetical Signals are ended.
14th    "WZN = "Street."
15th    "AEHV= "London."

ALPHABETICAL  (SPELLING)  SIGNALS.

    Under the arrangement explained below, every flag hoisted after Alphabetical Signal No. 1 has been made, and until Alphabetical Signal No. 3, or Numeral Signal No. 1 is made, represents the letter of the alphabet which has been allotted to it in the Code. As each of the 26 letters of the alphabet is now represented by a flag, any word can be spelt by this system.
    If the word to be spelt consists of more than four letters, two or more hoists must be used, as no hoist is to contain more than four flags, and, if any letter occurs more than once in the word, this letter must on its second occurrence begin or be in a second hoist, and on its third occurrence must begin or be in a third hoist.
    The following are the signals to be used:--
 
SignalMeaning.
Code Flag over
Flag E
ALPHABETICAL SIGNAL No. 1, indicating that the flags hoisted after it until Alphabetical Signal No. 3 or Numeral Signal No. 1 is made do not represent the signals in the Code, but are to be understood as having their alphabetical meanings and express individual letters of the alphabet which are to form words.
Code Flag over
Flag F
ALPHABETICAL SIGNAL No. 2, indicating the end of a word made by Alphabetical Signals, or dot between initials.
Code Flag over
Flag G
ALPHABETICAL SIGNAL No. 3, indicating that the Alphabetical Signals are ended; the signals which follow are to be looked out in the Code in the usual manner.

EXAMPLE TO SPELL "WILLIAM J. PERRY."
 
1st Hoist Code E = The signals which follow are alphabetical.
2nd   "WIL} = "William."
3rd    "LIAM
4th    "Code Flag over F = End of the word (also means dot between initials.)
5th    "J = J.
6th    "Code Flag over F = Dot between initials (also means end of the word).
7th    "PER} = "Perry."
8th    "RY
9th    "Code Flag over G = Alphabetical Signals are ended.
    An alternative method of spelling words is provided by the Alphabetical Spelling Table.

NUMERAL  SIGNALS.
_______

    Under the arrangement shown below, every flag hoisted after Numeral Signal No. 1 has been made, and until Numeral Signal No. 3 or Alphabetical Signal No 1 has been made, represents one or more figures, as indicated in the Numeral Table below.
    If the number to be signalled consists of more than four figures, two or more hoists must be used, as no hoist is to contain more than four flags; and if any figure occurs more than once in the same number, the figure must on its second occurrence begin or be in a second hoist, and on its third occurrence it must begin to be in a third hoist, unless use can be made of the signals K to Z in the Numeral Table below.

    The following are the signals to be used:--
 
Signal.Meaning.
Code Flag over
Flag M
NUMERAL SIGNAL No. 1, indicating that the flags hoisted after it, until Numeral Signal No. 3 or Alphabetical Signal No. 1 is made, do not represent the Signals in the Code but express figures, as indicated in the Numeral Table below, and have the special numerical values there given to them.
Code Flag over
Flag N
NUMERAL SIGNAL No. 2, indicating the decimal point.
Code Flag over
Flag O
NUMERAL SIGNAL No. 3, indicating that the Numeral Signals are ended; the signals which follow are to be looked out in the Code in the usual manner.

NUMERAL  SIGNALS.
 
Numeral Table.Examples.
A    =1
B=2
C=3
D=4
E=5
F=6
G=7
H=8
I=9
J=10
K=11
L=22
M=33
N=44
O=55
P=66
Q=77
R=88
S=99
T=100
U=0
V=00
W=000
X=0000
Y=00000
Z=   000000
TO  MAKE 78,865.
1st Hoist, Code Flag over M = The signals which follow are Numeral Signals, and are to be looked out in the Numeral Table.
2nd    "GRFE = 78,865
3rd    "Code Flag over O = The Numeral Signals are ended.
__________

TO  MAKE 787.
1st     "Code Flag over M = The signals which follow are Numeral Signals, and are to be looked out in the Numeral Table.
2nd    "GH=78} = 787
3rd    "G   =  7
4th     "Code Flag over O = The Numeral Signals are ended.
__________

TO  MAKE 9·99876
1st     "Code Flag over M = The signals which follow are Numeral Signals, and are to be looked out in the Numeral Table.
2nd    "I = 9.
3rd    "Code Flag over N = Decimal point 9·99876.
4th     "SHGF=99,876.
5th     "Code Flag over O = The Numeral Signals are ended.

SIGNALS  MADE  BY  ONE  FLAG.
______

To be used only between vessels towing and being towed.

    The flag may be exhibited by being held in the hand or by hoisting at the stay or fore shrouds or at the gaff, according to circumstances.
 
FlagMeaning when made by the Vessel towing.Meaning when made by the Vessel Towed.
AIs the tow rope fast, shall I help to heave the anchor?Tow rope is fast, help to heave the anchor.
BIs tow rope fast, all clear for towing?Tow rope is fast, all clear for towing.
CTighten the tow rope, I am going slow.Tighten the tow rope, go slow.
DPay out the tow rope, I am going slow.Paying out the tow rope, go slow.
EI am steering (steer) to starboard.I am steering (steer) to starboard.
FCast the tow rope off.Cast the tow rope off.
GI must cast the tow rope off, haul it in.I must cast the tow rope off, haul it in.
HThe tow rope is broken.The tow rope is broken.
II am steering (steer) to port.I am steering (steer) to port.
JRight, continue the same course.Right, continue the same course.
KI am keeping away before the sea.Keep away before the sea.
LI must get shelter (anchor) as soon as possible.Bring my ship to shelter (anchor) as soon as possible.
MShall we anchor at once?Anchor at once.
NI am going as slow as possible.Go as slow as possible.
OI will go slower.Go slower.
PI am going full speed.Go full speed.
QMy engines are going full speed astern.Agreed that your engines are going full speed astern.
RI am stopping my engines.Stop the engines at once.
SSet sails.I will set sails.
TTake in sails.I will take in sails.
UI am coming nearer, I wish to speak to you.Come nearer, I wish to speak to you.
VI cannot carry out your order.I cannot carry out your order.
WSignal for a pilot.I wish to take (discharge) pilot.
XMan overboard.Man overboard.
YLower a lifeboat.Lower a lifeboat.
ZBoat on board, commence towing.Boat on board, commence towing.


SIGNALS  BY  NIGHT.

    The above signals for use between a vessel towing and a vessel towed may be made at night with a lantern in accordance with the Morse Code.

URGENT  AND  IMPORTANT  SIGNALS  ARE  MADE  WITH  TWO  FLAGS,  viz:--
 
Code Flag over A. = "I am on full speed trial."
"B. = "I am taking in (or discharging) gunpowder or other explosives."
"C. = "Yes," or Affirmative.
"D. = "No," or Negative.
"E. = Alphabetical Signal, No. 1, (see page 24).
"F. = Alphabetical Signal, No. 2, (see page 24).
"G. = Alphabetical Signal, No. 3, (see page 24).
"H. = " Stop," " Heave - to," or " Come nearer," "Wish to communicate."
"I. = "I have not a clean bill of health."
"J. = "I have headway."
"K. = "I have sternway."
"L. = "I have (or have had) some dangerous infectious diseases on board."
"M. = Numeral Signal, No. 1, (see page 25).
"N. = Numeral Signal, No. 2, (see page 25).
"O. = Numeral Signal, No. 3, (see page 25).
"P. = "I am about to sail."
"Q. = "I have a clean bill of health, but am liable to quarantine."
"R. = "Do not pass ahead of me."
"S. = "I want a pilot."
"T. = "Do not overtake me."
"U. = "My engines are stopped."
"V. = "My engines are going astern."
"W. = "All boats are to return to the ship."
"X. = "I will pass ahead of you."
"Y. = "All ships of the convoy are to rejoin company."
"Z. = "I will pass astern of you."

    There is also a much enlarged series of "Urgent and Important Signals" made with any combination of two Flags, from Flags AB to ZY. Both of these series of Signals are, however, all included in the General Vocabulary, which is the part of the Signal Book generally used for giving a signal, excepting when a Compass, Money, Weights, Measures, Decimals, Fractions, Numeral Table, Latitude, Longitude, Division of Time, Barometer, Thermometer, Numeral, Geographical, or Alphabetical Spelling Table Signal is required. When it is wished to signal any of these, reference must be made to that part of the Signal Book which is specially designed to meet each case.