Adrian (Michigan) Daily Telegraph, December 23, 1919, page 1:

CAROLS  MAY  BE  HEARD  OVER  LENAWEE  COUNTY  BY  WIRELESS TONIGHT
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By  The  Associated  Press
    ANN ARBOR, Mich., Dec. 23.--Southeastern Michigan will receive its first aerial Christmas carols tonight, if plans of Colonel J. P. Lucas, military instructor at the University of Michigan here, do not miscarry. Colonel Lucas will transmit broadcast over a six hundred meter wave a number of Christmas musical numbers from the university radio station. Amateurs with ordinary receiving sets may hear the music. Colonel Lucas will transmit between 8:30 and 9:30 o'clock.
Ann Arbor (Michigan) Times News, December 24, 1919, page 8:

LOCAL  AMATEUR  HEARS  CAROLS  BY  WIRELESS
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    Perhaps the first of the amateur radio experimenters of this locality to report on the reception of radiophone music, sent out broadcast last night by Col. J. P. Lucas of the university, is Carl Beiser, 600 East Washington street, this city, a 17 year old high school lad.
    Carl, tuning his instruments last night for the experiment, heard clearly and distinctly, the song "O Silent Night" transmitted from the university radio station. He then heard "Humoresque", "Traumeri" and several others, practically all the numbers transmitted from Col. Lucas instruments.
    The experiment is the first of its nature to be tried broadcast in this section, it is believed.
Adrian (Michigan) Daily Telegraph, December 29, 1919, page 1:

WIRELESS  WAVES  TO  CARRY  GREETINGS  OF  NEW  YEAR
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By  The  Associated  Press
    ANN ARBOR, MICH., Dec. 29.--New Year's greetings will be transmitted broadcast by both radiophone and wireless telegraph from the stations at the University of Michigan on the night of December 31. The message will be sent out under the direction of Colonel J. P. Lucas and amateurs are asked to report on receiving of it. A wave length of 600 and 668 meters will be used.
The (University of) Michigan Technic, March, 1920, page 69:

SIGNAL  CORPS  LABORATORY
    The laboratory of the Signal Corps unit of the R. O. T. C. is in room 105, New Engineering Building. The equipment on hand at present is, principally, that which was used for field communication in France. This consists of telegraph, telephone and radio equipment, signal lamps, etc. The radio equipment is more extensive than any other as this branch of the service of communication is becoming of increasing importance and will probably in the next war supplant, to a large extent, the use of wire.
    The only transmitter in use at the present time is an undamped wave set sending at 825 Meters. In a few days, however, a spark set will be in operation on a wave length somewhere between 400 and 800 Meters.
    In addition to this, considerable experimenting has been done with the Wireless Telephone. These signals can be picked up by any damped wave set at about 685 Meters. Any student who is interested in this apparatus and would like to inspect it is at perfect liberty to visit the laboratory. Arrangements should be made with Captain Lucas in Room 239.
The (University of) Michigan Technic, May, 1920, pages 103-104:

UNIVERSITY  WIRELESS  STATION  RECEIVES  LICENSE
    The University wireless station has been assigned its former call letters (8 X A) and has resumed its pre-war basis. This station is for experimental purposes only. However it is equipped with the latest equipment and is capable of receiving messages from about 7,000 miles. This station is open to visitors on Monday evenings. At other times it is open to operators exclusively.
    The call letters of the wireless station of the Signal Corps is W  N  9.