Linton (Indiana) Daily Citizen, September 2, 1921, page 2:

WILL  HAYS  AT  HEAD  OF  RADIO  PROJECT
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Radio  Phones  of  Uncle  Sam  to  Send  Out  News  to  American  Homes.
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ALL  MAY  "LISTEN  IN"
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Will  Be  a  Stupendous  Undertaking  in  the  Realm  of  Radio  Telephony.
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    WASHINGTON, Sept. 2--Postmaster General Hays announced yesterday the embarkation of the government of the development of a stupendous undertaking in the realm of radio telephony.
    The project is the dissemination of weather and market reports and other government information, news of the day, and other matters of interest to offices and homes throughout the country by radio telephone.
    Involved in the undertaking is the big question of the control of radio telegraphy and telephony by the government, to which President Harding soon is to direct the attention of congress as a result of a study of the problem by an interdepartment board.
    The system of disseminating government information by radio telephony has been worked out for Mr. Hays by J. C. Edgerton, of the post office department; W. A. Wheeler, of the department of agriculture and R. B. Howell, of Omaha, an authority on wireless.

To  Study  European  System.

    Mr. Hays announced that Mr. Howell is sailing for Europe on Saturday to conduct an investigation for the government at his own expense of the operation of a radio telephone system in Berlin and of a "telephone newspaper" in Budapest. Mr. Howell is Republican national committeeman from Nebraska, and is reported to be a prospective candidate for the senate to succeed Senator Hitchcock. With the system planned by Mr. Hays in operation, the farmer who installed the requisite receiving apparatus, now costing about $100, would receive on his farm the market, live stock, weather, and other government information disseminated from Washington at fixed times during the day.

Plans  Transmitting  Stations.

    It is planned to have the country dotted with transmitting stations having a radius of transmission of 200 miles, from which the businessman at his office, the farmer on his farm, and the urbanite in his home would receive the messages. The transmitting stations would receive the information broadcasted by wireless from Washington.
    This radio service Mr. Hays plans to place under the direction of a new bureau of communications, soon to be created in the post office department, for the immediate purpose of systematizing government telegraphing. Mr. Hays says that by the use of leased wires and through other economies the telegraphing bill of the government can be reduced $250,000 a year.
    Radio telegraphy for the dissemination of market reports already is being employed by the post office department. At 8 o'clock every night the air mail radio station in the office department transmits the agricultural reports on grain and live stock and on fruit and vegetables to the air mail radio station at Cincinnati, St. Louis, Omaha, North Platte, Neb.; Rocky Springs, Wyo.; Elko and Reno, Nev.
    These stations, having a radius of 300 miles, broadcast the reports into the ether and they are received by such institutions and individuals as possess the requisite receiving apparatus.
    The dissemination of government information by radio telephony is to be a development on a prodigious scale of the existing system. Mr. Hays pronounces without limit the possibilities.