No single event or station introduced radio broadcasting to the entire United States. Instead, broadcasting activities evolved in many locations, slowly entering the public consciousness. By early 1922 there was enough organized activity for various publications to begin putting together national lists of stations that were providing broadcasts intended for the general public. However, because of the scattered nature of the activities, no single list at this time, including this one, was able to keep up with all the stations on the air. (It is interesting to note that while a headline refers to this article as a "complete list of broadcasting stations", the text includes the author's "doubt if it contains twenty-five per cent" of the broadcasts that were on the air).

The list below was prepared while U.S. broadcasting was going through an important transition. Initially there had been no restrictions on which radio stations could broadcast programs intended for the general public. But on December 1, 1921 the Bureau of Navigation issued a new regulation, which restricted non-government broadcasting to only those stations which held a Limited Commercial licence plus an authorization to use the Entertainment wavelength of 360 meters (833 kilohertz), and/or the Market and Weather wavelength of 485 meters (619 kilohertz). It took a few months for all the stations to fall in line with this new broadcast service regulation, which means that in the list below many stations from other licence categories are still included. However, these stations were now required to either get Limited Commercial licences or stop making broadcasts. (A review of how you can determine a station's licence classification from its callsign is included at the close of this list).

 
Radio News, March, 1922, pages 814, 874, 876, 878, 880, 882, 884, 886, 888, 891, 893-894:

What  Anyone  Can  Hear
Complete  List  of  Broadcasting  Stations  in  U.S.
By  ARMSTRONG  PERRY


THE present article by Mr. Perry is one of the most important because it gives a complete list of all the present broadcasting stations throughout the country. Things are moving so rapidly in Radio of late that it becomes almost impossible to keep up with the trend.
    It is of course no news to anyone that at present Radio companies, be they manufacturers, dealers, or jobbers, are springing up by the dozen over night; but it will come as a surprise to even the wise ones that there are now over seventy broadcasting radio telephone stations throughout the country, and new ones are being added almost every week. It seems that the Radio interests have awakened to the fact that a broadcasting station on top of their roof will pay for itself within 48 hours.
    And we are only at the very beginning of things. Thus, for instance, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company is now erecting in New York City, the most powerful broadcasting radio telephone station in the country. And for what purpose do you think they are doing it? To rent out the station!
    In other words, within a month from the date this is written, the advertising manager of a big New York department store may reach for his desk telephone, and talk over the new broadcasting station to several hundred thousand people, giving them the latest prices and sales talk from gold fish to pianos. He need not leave his desk, as his telephone through "Central" will be connected to the broadcasting station. Thence his voice will be connected with the Radio transmitter to be hurled out into space. The American Telephone and Telegraph Company will hire out their station to anyone who wishes to rent it for any length of time, day or night. This may seem nothing but a stunt to us, but it is the coming thing. It merely goes to show what a tremendous grip the Radio telephone has upon the popular imagination to-day.--EDITOR.

SUPPOSE the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. and its local subsidiary companies had tried to build up a business as the radio interests are trying to build up theirs. Suppose that, instead of issuing directories telling whom you can talk to with a telephone, they should offer you an installation backed up by only two arguments: First, that you can talk; second, that you can hear. Would you fall for such a proposition?
    Maybe you would. Phonographs were sold in the early days even though there was little in the way of records to play on them. People are still buying toy motion picture machines with only 20' of film. They are still born at the rate of one every minute, or more. But the manufacturer or dealer who wants to sell radio, keep it sold and build up a business, must recognize the fact that at the present stage of the industry the middle eighty per cent of the population is his field, not the submerged tenth who fall for a thing just because it is new, nor the intellectual ten per cent who are capable of learning radio. The "radio amateur" represents only the big game, like the elephant or moose that can be stalked and brought into camp occasionally. Some people make money hunting elephants. Also some can sell Rolls-Royces, but Henry Ford is the only man today who is rated higher than John D. Rockefeller, and both of them built their successes on the common people. The common people are ripe for radio if they are told what they can hear. I have answered during the past year several hundreds of letters from men and boys who wanted to use radio. I am beginning to get letters now from women, and women spend more than eighty per cent of the household funds. Practically every letter shows that the common people are hopelessly confused by the advertising, the catalogs, and even by the radio magazines. What they want to know is: "What can I hear with a radio outfit and how can I hear it?"
    Careful inquiry failed to reveal any list of the things that common folks--those who want to use radio without studying the theory, learning the code or building, apparatus--could hear. We have our call books, but they are all Greek to the novice. Even these of us who have used them for years cannot get out of them what the common people want to know, because it is not there. These books do not tell about the concerts, the lectures, the bedtime stories, the church services that are in the air. Those are the things that the army of new radio customers wants to know about.
    Thinking that the collection of a list of broadcasts of interest to the public would be of service in the promotion of radio as a household utility, I wrote to all the manufacturers and dealers whose names and addresses I could secure. To my utter astonishment the replies showed that not one out of three knew himself what could be heard with the apparatus he made and sold. Even the fact that the list was to have a circulation of at least half a million, among persons who would be influenced by thousands to buy radio receivers, failed to stimulate many of them to the point of digging up such local information as they could secure in five minutes' conversation with any enthusiastic amateur.
    Many of them gave me the information that they were very busy. I was interested in that, but it was no news to me. From radio departments in department stores to the high class shops specializing in radio, I had heard of the fact that the manufacturers had fallen down--that deliveries, just at the beginning of a radio era that should make millionaires, were 30 days and more behind. No manufacturer, so far as I could learn, had had confidence enough in himself and his business to use the dull months last summer to really get ready for the holiday trade.
    But a few came across with lists of voice broadcasts. Altogether, the list is impressive, though I doubt if it contains twenty-five per cent of the reliable broadcasts that people would buy receivers to hear.
    In Washington I have been getting White and Boyer's concerts once or twice a week Once a week I heard a lecture from the United States Public Health Service, with music before and after. From the Church of the Covenant I have heard not only the morning and evening services but also afternoon addresses by eminent men and women. To get all these things, I have used a mineral detector set that cost less than $30 to buy and install. I could have managed it successfully without any technical knowledge. Other folks in the house learned to use it in a few minutes. But the people of Washington do not know that such a boon is within their reach. They have read about it, but they do not know it. I have talked with scores of them and they have marvelled at the simple facts that I have given them.
    The man who sold me the set would have sold me a regenerative receiver if he had had his way. He would have had me all tangled up in complicated connections, doubtful about the expediency of bringing into the house a storage battery full of sulphuric acid solution that eats whatever it touches if it is spilled, prudently considering problems of upkeep that do not arise in using the simple set I bought.
    These Washington broadcasts could be maintained just as well in the summer time, when atmospheric conditions cause the DXer to pack up his troubles, leave them in the closet and go off for a vacation. More people stay at home than can afford to go away. If they can bring in a concert from five miles away, they should worry because the range of the broadcast is cut down from 300 miles to 30, by the summer static.
    My list of broadcasts probably contains errors. Much of the information is from listeners, and not all of it has been checked up by the broadcasting stations. But such as it is, I got it up with my own money and with the kind co-operation of a few manufacturers and dealers, and I offer it to radio men for what it is worth. Somebody, I hope, will be inspired to maintain a complete list and keep it accurate and up-to-date. Such a list could be printed in a booklet, with a manufacturer's or dealer's advertising, and given away to prospects and customers, or sold for enough to cover the cost of printing.

MOST  IMPORTANT  BROADCAST  OF  ALL  FOR  YOU

    The Amateur Broadcast transmitted from the United States Navy Station NAH, New York City, daily about 9.30 P. M., on 1832 meters is undoubtedly the most important broadcast for the American citizen to receive.
    The message usually is short, about 25 words. It is sent at slow speed, 10 words per minute, and with great distinctness.
    The message is always of interest and often of value, but the importance of the broadcast does not depend upon that alone. It is the means by which the citizen may keep in direct touch with our Government and make sure of receiving instant advice concerning an impending disaster, such for instance as the approach of a hostile air fleet, or the menace of an epidemic against which immediate precautions might prevail.
    Every American community is neglecting one of its greatest opportunities if it fails to receive this broadcast daily, and thus keep the line of communication open. One boy, or young man, or girl in any community, with an efficient radio receiver, could maintain this contact with Washington. In time of danger a continuous watch could be maintained--an easy matter if the system is once established locally. The Boy Scouts of America are especially encouraged to serve as operators and messengers in this system.
    In times of danger, speed is necessary. Wire service is fast, but radio is instantaneous. One Government official in Washington could give a word of warning to every American community at the same moment if every community were listening.
    Sometimes, to provide a means of secrecy, these messages are transmitted in Navy Amateur Code. Key to the codes used will be sent free on request by the Seascout Radio Commodore, 200 Fifth Avenue, New York City.

BROADCASTS  FROM  GOVERNMENT  STATIONS
(International  Morse  Code)

    Weather reports are transmitted by Naval Radio Stations as follows:
Atlantic Coast.
Washington, call letters NAA, 2650 meters. 10 P. M. (Eastern Standard Time). Time signals start at 9.55 and stop at 10 P. M.
Key West, Florida, call letters NAR, 1500 meters. Same time.
Great Lakes.
Great Lakes, call letters NAJ, 1512 meters. 10 P. M. (Central Standard Time). Time signals 9.55 to 10 P. M.
Pacific Coast.
San Francisco, call letters NPH, 952 meters. Noon and 10 P. M. Preceded by time signals on 2400 and 4800 meters from 9.55 to 10 P. M.
North Head, call letters NPE, 952 meters. Same schedule.
San Diego, call letters NPL, 952 meters. Same schedule.
    Local weather reports are broadcasted by Tatoosh, North Head, San Francisco and San Diego at 8 A. M. and 4 P. M. on 600 meters and at noon and 10 P. M. on 952 meters. Also by Puget Sound, Marshfield and Point Arguella at noon and 10 P. M. on 600 meters. Total weather report from Farallone Islands is forwarded to San Francisco for Marine Exchange at 8 A. M., noon, and 5 P. M.
    There are Navy radio stations in or near most of the coast cities of the United States and its islands. Many of these transmit press. Details are not given in the pamphlet on Commercial and Government Radio Stations of the United States, but they are usually known to local amateurs.
    An example of the broadcast schedules of Navy stations is given in the following official statement: "All Broadcast Schedules of the Third Naval District are transmitted by the U. S. Naval Radio Station, Navy Yard, New York on 1832 meter wavelength as follows: Ten thirty A. M. and five P. M. Weather and Hydrographic information; Nine P. M. and three A. M. press; Nine thirty P. M. Amateur Radio Broadcast."

RADIO  MARKET  NEWS  SERVICE

    The Bureau of Markets and Crop Estimates of the United States Department of Agriculture, in coöperation with the Air Mail Radio Service of the Post Office Department, broadcasts market news by radio daily except Sundays and holidays, in accordance with the following schedule: Between June 15 and September 15 no radio reports will be broadcasted on Saturdays after 1 P. M. Notice of any changes in this schedule will be broadcasted in connection with the radio reports for one or more days prior to the date such changes become effective.
Washington, D. C. Call letters WWX. Weather 10 A. M. Grain and live stock, 7.30 to 8 P. M. Fruit and vegetables, 8 to 8.30 P. M. Eastern time. 1800 meters.
Cincinnati, Ohio. Call letters KDQC. Live stock receipts 9 to 9.15 A. M. Chicago live stock 11 to 11.30 A. M. St. Louis live stock 12 to 12.30 P. M. Chicago live stock 7.30 to 7.45 P. M. St. Louis live stock 8 to 8.15 P. M. Central time. 4000 meters.
Omaha, Neb. Call letters KDEF. Live stock receipts 9 to 9.15 A. M. Chicago live stock 11 to 11.30 A. M. Omaha live stock 12 to 12.30 P. M. Kansas City live stock 1 to 1.30 P. M. Grain 2 to 2.15 P. M. Chicago live stock 4.30 to 4.45 P. M. Kansas City live stock 7 to 7.15 P. M. Omaha live stock 7.30 to 7.45 P. M. Central time. 2500 meters.
North Platte, Neb. Call letters KDHM. Live stock receipts 9 to 9.15 A. M. Chicago live stock 12 to 12.30 P. M. Chicago live stock 5 to 5.15 P. M. Kansas City live stock 8 to 8.15 P. M. Omaha live stock 8.30 to 8.45 P. M. Mountain time. 3000 meters.
Rock Springs, Wyo. Call letters KDHN. Live stock receipts 9 to 9.15 A. M. Chicago live stock 12 to 12.30 P. M. Chicago live stock 4.30 to 4.45 P. M. Kansas City live stock 8 to 8.15 P. M. Omaha live stock 8.30 to 8.45 P. M. Mountain time. 3000 meters.
Elko, Nevada. Call letters KDEJ. Live stock receipts 8.30 to 8.45 P. M. Chicago live stock 12 to 12.30 P. M. Chicago live stock 4 to 4.15 P. M. Pacific time. 3000 meters.
Reno, Nevada. Transmits on 3000 meters at 10 A. M.
    Weather reports for mailplane pilots are broadcasted whenever conditions require it. Pilots listen at all times while in the air.
    The above market reports, whether sent in Morse code or by radio telephone, are given by using abbreviations that would not be understood unless the receiver had before him the blanks provided by the Bureau of Markets. A supply of these should be obtained from the Bureau. With them even a novice can receive the reports. The reports are repeated by a number of local radio stations, especially those connected with State Universities and Colleges. Details can be obtained locally.

CONCERTS,  STORIES,  LECTURES,  NEWS,  SERMONS

Akron, Ohio. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 6.30 to 7 P. M. Eastern Standard Time, 190 or 200 meters, Radioart Store station. Call letters 8UX. Radiofone, latest phonograph records. Normal range 30 miles. Exceptional range, 200 miles.
    Friday evenings. Cleveland Radio Association. Concerts.
    Daily except Sunday, 8 to 9 P. M., Eastern Standard Time, 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
Atlanta, Georgia. Daily 7 P. M., Eastern Standard Time. 5500 meters. Mexico City, Mexico, station. Call letters XDA. Spanish press.
    Daily 8 to 8.15 P. M. 4000 meters. Cincinnati station. Call letters KDQC. Press.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Newark, N. J. Call letters WJZ. Press and music.
    Schedule unknown. 200 to 250 meters. Government station, Anacostia, D. C. Call letters NSF. Radio telephone.
    No regular schedules. 200 meters. Amateur stations 4ZF, 4BT, 4CO, 4VA, Music.
    Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, and possibly Saturday, 7.30 to 8 P. M. 200 meters (may change to 275, 325 or 375 meters). Carter Electric Company. Call letters 4CD. Music and press. This station was installing radio telephone on date of report.
    No schedule. Amateur station Rome, Georgia. Call letters 4BQ. Radio telephone. Range said to be 500 miles.
Berlin, N. H., Y. M. C. A., is installing radio telephone transmitter for broadcasting program of interest to the public.
Buffalo, New York. Daily except Sunday, 8 to 9 P. M. Eastern Standard Time. 375 meters. Westinghouse Station, Pittsburgh. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse stations.
    Newark, N. J. Call letters WJZ. Press and music.
    Monday and Thursday, 8 to 9.30 P. M., 450 meters. Canadian Independent Telephone Company, Toronto, Canada. Radio telephone, wonderfully clear voice modulation.
Boston, Mass. Daily except Sunday, 8 to 9 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    No schedule. H. A. Beale's station, Parkesburg, Pa. Call letters 3ZO. Radio telephone.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Newark, N. J. Call letters WJZ. Press. Music.
    No schedule. T. F. J. Howlett's station, Philadelphia, Pa. Call letters 3AWI. Radio telephone.
    No schedule. (200 and 250 meters.) Government station Anacostia, D. C. Call letters NSF. Radio telephone.
    No schedule reported. Variable wave lengths. Union College, Schnectady, New York. Call letters 2XQ. Music. Church service.
    Daily, 8 P. M., 350 meters. American Radio and Research Corporation station, Medford Hillside, Mass. Call letters WGI. Boston city police reports, first in International Morse Code, ten words per minute, then by radio telephone.
    Wednesday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Concert.
    Tuesday and Thursday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Burgess Bed Time Stories.
    Monday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Publicity and information of general interest.
    Saturday, 8.15 P. M. Football, baseball and other athletic events and general news.
    Special broadcasts. Same station. U. S. Public Health Service Lectures. Detailed reports of World Series. Concerts by high class artists. Sermons on Sundays. Address by prominent speakers. Business reports. Heard in Indiana, North Carolina, Canada, Texas, and on board ships in the Atlantic.
    No schedule. Raymond F. Farnham's station, Pawtucket, R. I. Call letters 1OJ. Radio telephone.
    No schedule. Thomas Giblin's station, Pawtucket, R. I. Call letters 1XAD. Radio telephone.
Cambridge, Mass. Daily except Sunday, 8 to 9 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh, Pa. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    No schedule. 1600 meters. Station of National Amateur Wireless Association. New York City. Reports of athletic championship events such as the Dempsey-Carpentier fight, and the baseball World Series. Concerts by famous musicians. Daily papers announce details needed by persons who wish to hear the broadcasts from this station.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M., 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Newark. N. J. Call letters WJZ. Press and music.
    Daily, 7 P. M. H. B. Richmond reports: "One station using but a single wire aerial, detector and 2-Step amplifying unit, has been able to copy the time signals from Honolulu, Hawaii, and Nauen, Germany. . . . These stations are sending the time signals 12 hours apart, yet they are received in Boston simultaneously. Nauen is sending signals at midnight. . . . The time signals from Honolulu are being sent out at 12 o'clock noon of the previous day. Because of the difference in time both come in at Boston at 7 :00 o'clock P. M. It is quite effective to sit at one's apparatus and by simply turning the condenser knob shift from Germany to Honolulu, realizing as we do that these places are 12 hours apart; in other words, on opposite sides of the globe.
    No schedule. Local radiophone concerts.
Chicago, Illinois. 8 P. M. Westinghouse station, Chicago. Call letters KYW. Music. Grand opera every night.
    Navy station. Call letters NUR. Weather forecast, market reports. Press.
    Army station at Fort Sheridan (not complete for public transmission on date of report).
    Police and Fire Departments reported to be experimenting with radio telephone.
    Amateur stations 9XG and 9LY. Music.
Cincinnati, Ohio. Daily except Sunday. 7 to 8 P. M. Central Standard Time. 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh, Pa. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 6 to 7 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    Schedule not given. Government station, Anacostia. D. C. Call letters NSF. Radio telephone.
    Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, 8 P. M. Central Standard Time. 375 meters. Station of Precision Equipment Co. Call letters 8XB. Music, vaudeville. baseball scores and other information of value. Heard in Iowa, Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, Canada, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Florida and Tennessee.
Cleveland, Ohio. Sunday, 7.30 or 8 P. M. Eastern Standard Time. Station of Cox Manufacturing Company, Cleveland. Call letters 8ACS. 200 meters. Music and voice. Can be heard with mineral detector receivers in Cleveland and suburbs. With amplifiers it is heard clearly at distances up to 50 or 60 miles and has repeatedly been heard at distances of several hundred miles.
    Thursday evenings. Concerts under auspices of Cleveland Radio Association. Different members give these concerts. They are heard throughout Greater Cleveland and sometimes at greater distances.
    Daily except Sunday, 8 to 9 P. M. 375 meters. Westinghouse station, Pittsburgh, Pa. Call letters KDKA. Press and music.
    Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M. Same station. Church service.
    Reception of broadcasts from the above station is subject to local interference.
    Almost any evening. Various radio telephones.
    Occasionally in the evening. Westinghouse stations at Newark, N. J., and Chicago. Music and press.
Columbus, Ohio. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 7.30 P. M. Central Standard Time. 200 meters. Station of Electrical Specialty Company. Call letters 8BYV. Music, football scores, baseball scores and other news.
    Daily except Sunday, 7 to 8 P. M., Central Standard Time. 375 meters. Westinghouse Station, Pittsburgh, Pa. Call letters KDKA. Music and press. Market reports..
    Sunday, 6 to 7 P. M., Central Standard Time. Same station. Church service.
    Daily except Sunday, 6 to 7 P. M. Central Standard Time. Westinghouse station, Newark, N. J. Call letters WJZ. Market reports, music, press.
    No schedule. Doron Brothers Electrical Company, Hamilton, Ohio, station. 200 meters or over. Radio telephone.
    McCook Field, United States Army, Dayton, O. Call letters WA-1. Radio telephone.
    United States Army station, Fairfield, Ohio. Call letters WL-2. Radio telephone.
    No schedule reported. 275 meters. Station of Ohio State University, Columbus. Time signals, market reports and other useful information. Call letters 8YO.
    Daily except Sunday, 12.35 P. M., Central Standard Time. 800 meters. University of Wisconsin station. Call letters 9XM. Weather forecast for Wisconsin. In international Morse Code, 18 words per minute. Repeated at 7 words per minute. Then repeated by voice from radio telephone three times.
    Daily except Sunday. Same station and wave-length. 12.15 P. M. Report of Wisconsin Department of Markets. Same code, 10 words per minute. Special abbreviations are used. Persons interested should secure from the University Forms MI-20 and MI-22. Reports are repeated by voice from radio telephone, using same special abbreviations, beginning 12.50 P. M.
    Friday, 7.30 P. M. Same station and wave-length. Edison phonograph music. At 8.15 P. M., wave-length is changed to 375 meters for the benefit of those whose receivers will not receive the longer wave. Concerts given in the University Armory by distinguished artists such as Vecsey, Lhevinne and Casals are transmitted by radio telephone in place of the phonograph concerts whenever the consent of the artists is obtained.
    Monday, 9 to 11.30 P. M., Central Standard Time. 375 meters. Same station. Campus news exchange with other universities. International Morse Code, 20 words per minute.
    Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 to 12 P. M. (beginning one hour earlier on Friday). Same station. 330 meters. Exchange of messages with amateurs. Wave-length raised to 375 on Friday. Speed adapted to the operator who calls.
    Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, 8 P. M., Central Standard Time. 375 meters. Station of Precision Equipment company, Cincinnati. Call letters 8XB. Music, vaudeville, baseball scores and other information.
    No schedule given. Station of University of Iowa, Iowa City. Call letters 9YA. Market reports by radio telephone.
    No schedule given. Station of DeForest Radio Telephone and Telegraph Company, Ossining, N. Y.
Dallas, Texas. Rumored that the Westinghouse Company will establish a broadcasting station similar to that at Newark, N. J.
Davenport, Iowa. Tri-City Radio Electric Supply Company reports: "Physically impossible to list all the calls heard. We get all the stations sending market reports. Hear Los Angeles music. Get NAH (U. S. Navy station, New York), like a "ton of bricks."
Denver, Colorado. Daily, 10 P. M. Y. M. C. A. station, Time signals, weather report and news.
    Thursday, 8 to 9.30 P. M. Fitzsimons Hospital station. Concert.
    Daily, 8.30 A. M. Station of Reynolds Radio Company, Inc. Weather forecast (voice only). Radius 250 miles. Call letters 9ZAF.
    Daily, 9 P. M. Same station. Weather forecast (voice only). Radius 1,000 miles.
    Sunday, 8 to 10 P. M. Same station. Concert. Radius 1,000 miles. This music is used for dances in Wyoming, Nebraska and Kansas.
Galveston, Texas. Galveston Wireless Supply Company reports: "Hear press and music from Houston, 65 miles away. Do not know schedules. We expect to install 30-mile radiophone and later a transmitter for relay and press work on regular schedule.
Hartford, Connecticut. Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 8 P. M., Eastern Standard Time. 425 meters. Station of The C. D. Tuska Company. Call letters WQB. Concerts. These have been heard over a range of approximately 900 miles.
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Hack's Electrical Store broadcasts program of interest to the public.
Kansas City, Missouri. 11.30 A. M. 375 meters. Station of Western Radio Company. Call letters 9XAB. Kansas City Live Stock Market reports and weather forecast. Voice only.
    2 P. M. Same station. Kansas City and Chicago Live Stock Market report, grain market and weather report.
    7.30 P. M. Same station. Repeats market and weather reports, followed by concert at 8.
    8.30 to 9 P. M. Same station. Concert. Phonograph, and vocal and instrumental music.
    Radio telephone is used exclusively in the above broadcasts and the voice at the telephone is heard over a range of 1,000 miles.
Lincoln, Nebraska. Noon and 7.30 P. M. University of Nebraska station. Call letters 9YY. Phonograph concerts. Range several hundred miles.
Los Angeles, Cal. Hamburger's Department Store broadcasts program of interest to the public. Range 1,000 miles.
Louisville, Ky. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10 P. M. 200 meters. Station of Darrell Ashton Downard. Call letters 9ARU. Police news in code.
Madison, Wisconsin. Daily except Sunday, 12.35 P. M., Central Standard Time. 800 meters. University of Wisconsin station. Call letters 9XM. Weather forecast for Wisconsin. In International Morse Code, 18 words per minute. Repeated at 7 words per minute. Then repeated by voice from radio telephone three times.
    Daily except Sunday, 12.15 P. M. Same station and wave-length. Report of Wisconsin Department of Markets. Same code, 10 words per minute. Special abbreviations are used. Persons interested should secure from the University Forms MI-20 and MI-22. Reports are repeated by voice from radio telephone, using same abbreviations, beginning 12.50 P. M.
    Friday, 7.30 P. M. Same station and wave-length. Edison phonograph, music. At 8.15 P. M., wave-length is changed to 375 meters for the benefit of those whose receivers will not receive the longer waves. Concerts given in the University Armory by distinguished artists such as Vecsey, Lhevinne and Casals are transmitted by radio telephone in place of the phonograph concerts whenever the consent of the artists is obtained.
    Monday, 9 to 11.30 P. M. 375 meters. Same station. Campus news exchange with other Universities. International Morse Code, 20 words per minute.
    Tuesday, Thursday, 10 to 12 P. M. Same station. 330 meters. Exchange of messages with amateurs.
    Friday, 9 to 12 P. M. Same station. 375 meters. Messages and tests. Speed adapted to amateurs.
Medford Hillside, Mass., Daily, 8 P. M. 350 meters. Station of American Radio and Research Corporation. Call letters WGI. Boston city police reports, first in International Morse Code, ten words per minute, then by radio telephone.
    Wednesday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Concert.
    Tuesday and Thursday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Burgess Bed Time Stories.
    Monday, 8.15 P. M. Same station. Publicity and information of general interest.
    Friday, 8 P. M. Amateur Night. Code instruction; new licenses announced.
    Saturday, 8. 15 P. M. Football, baseball, other sporting events and general news.
    Special broadcasts. Same station. United States Public Health Service Lectures. Detailed reports of World Series. Concerts by high class artists. Sermons on Sundays. Addressed by prominent speakers. Business reports. Voices from this station are heard in Indiana, North Carolina, Canada, Texas, and on board ships in the Atlantic.
Menominee, Michigan. Reported by Signal Electric Manufacturing Company that they hear all broadcasts sent out with sufficient power to carry up to 800 or 1,000 miles.
Montreal, Canada. Tuesday, 8 to 9.30 P. M. 1,200 meters. Station of the Marconi Telegraph Company of Canada, Limited. Radiophone concerts, news bulletins, notices of wireless society meetings and other information. Range about 200 miles. Heard at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.
Newark, New Jersey. Radio telephone broadcasts and all sorts of traffic too numerous to mention. Wireless Equipment Company reports hearing amateur Radio telephones in New York, Perth Amboy and Rutherford. Also Westinghouse station WJZ, Army radio telephones at Fort Wood, N. Y., and the De Forest Radio Telephone and Telegraph Company's broadcasts.
    The Westinghouse Company's radio telephone broadcasting station in Newark is one of the most powerful in the country and, like this company's stations in Springfield, Mass., Pittsburgh, and Chicago, provides varied entertainment for all who listen in during the day and evening. With proper receiving apparatus Westinghouse Broadcasts may be heard over practically the entire Eastern United States and the addition of multistage amplifiers and loud speakers will make the music, sermons and other things audible throughout the largest auditorium.
New York City. A list of all that can be heard with a radio receiver anywhere within three hundred miles of Greater New York would fill a book. At any hour of the day or night, with any type of apparatus, adjusted to receive waves of any length, the listener will hear something of interest. Scores of ships may be heard exchanging messages with shore stations or with each other in the International Morse Code. Many of them have radio telephones also and conversations may be heard in many different languages. Government stations send out weather forecasts, hydrographic information and time signals. Amateurs signal in Morse code, converse over radio telephones or amuse the world by playing jazz. At times there is so much going on that it is difficult to tune out all but the station that the hearer wishes to receive, though the selectivity of modern tuning apparatus is marvelous. By merely listening in and writing down the adjustment of the receiving apparatus at the time when it brings in each station, anyone may quickly develop a list of broadcasts and then add to it each day as new and interesting stations are discovered.
    One man reports: "I can hear nearly every high power station in the world."
Paris, Texas. Daily, 7 P. M. 375 meters. Station of James L. Autry, Junior, Houston, Texas. Call letters 5ZX. Weather forecast and local news. International Morse Code.
    Daily, 7 P. M. 375 meters. Dallas, Texas, station. Call letters 5ZC. Weather forecast, highway report (CAMAA), police bulletin and local news. Code.
    No schedule given. 375 meters. State University, Austin, Texas. Results of athletic contests, local news and other information. Call letters 5ZU. Code.
    Daily, 7.30 P. M. 450 meters. Dallas, Texas, station. Call letters WRR. Police and Fire Departments. Weather forecast, police bulletins, local news and other information. Radio telephone.
    Daily, 8.30 to 9 p. m. Same station. Concerts.
    Daily, 6 P. M., until 11 or 12 P. M. 375 meters. Denver, Colorado, station. Addresses, music and local news.
    At intervals. California stations. College stations in New York, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Dakotas, Indiana, Missouri, Georgia, Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Virginia, Kentucky.
    All the above were reported by A. L. Overstreet.
Pittsburgh, Pa., Daily, 8 P. M. 360 meters. Westinghouse Station. Varied program. Doubleday-Hill Electric Co. 450 meters. Range 700 miles. Schedule to be announced.
San Francisco, Cal. Leo J. Meyberg Company reports the following concert schedule:
    Sunday, 10 to 11 A. M., Fairmont Hotel station.
    Monday, 7 to 9 P. M., Presidio station.
    Monday, 7.30 to 8.30 P. M., Los Altos station.
    Monday, 8.30 to 9 P. M., Fairmont Hotel station.
    Tuesday, 7.30 to 8.15 P. M., Hotel Oakland station.
    Tuesday, 8.15 to 9 P. M., Radio Shop station, Sunnyvale.
    Wednesday, 7.30 to 8.15 P. M., Harrold Laboratories, San Jose.
    Thursday, 7.30 to 8.30 P. M., Fairmont Hotel station.
    Thursday, 8.30 to 9 P. M., Los Altos station.
    Friday, 7.30 to 8.15 P. M., Radio Shop station, Sunnyvale.
    Friday, 8.15 to 9 P. M., Hotel Oakland station.
    Saturday, 8.15 to 9 P. M., Fairmont Hotel station.
    Every afternoon except Sunday, 3.30 to 4.30 P. M., Rockridge station of Atlantic-Pacific Radio Supplies Company. 360 meters. Call letters KZY. Concert.
    Every night except Sunday, 6.45 to 7 P. M. Same station. General news, sports, foreign news.
    Sunday, 11 A. M. to 12.15 P. M., sermon and sacred music. Same station.**
    3 to 4 P. M., Same station. Concert.
    4 to 5 P. M., Same station. Concert**
    **This station will carry the Sunday morning schedule of Trinity Center and the Sunday afternoon schedule of Colin B. Kennedy until these two stations are ready to carry their schedules shown for that day.
    Wednesday, 7.30 to 8.15 P. M. Same station. Concert.
    Saturday, 8.15 to 9 P. M. Same station. Concert.
    Also the following, daily except Sunday:
    7.10 to 7.20 P. M., Hotel Oakland station. General news.
    7.20 to 7.30 P. M., Fairmont Hotel station. Market, bond, and weather reports.
    4.30 to 5.30, Fairmont Hotel station.
    Until the California Theatre can make the necessary changes to operate on 360 meters, the Presidio will broadcast concerts on their schedule, Wednesday evenings, 8.15 to 9, and the Fairmont Hotel will run the full hour and a half from 7.30 to 9 P. M. on Saturdays.
    The Fairmont Hotel, Los Altos, Hotel Oakland, and the Presidio are heard consistently up to 1,500 miles. Reports have been received from Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Montana, North Dakota, and practically all of the Northwestern states. Stations within a radius of two and three hundred miles are consistently receiving concerts from the above mentioned stations loudly enough to be heard all over the house.
    Rumored that Westinghouse Company will establish broadcasting station similar to that at Newark N. J.
St. Paul, Minnesota. It is reported that through cooperation with city officials, a Boy Scout Municipal Radio station is being established. The station will be able to send by radio telegraph over a radius of 1,000 miles and by radio telephone as high as 500 miles. It will distribute crop and weather reports and cooperate with the State Department of Forestry by reporting forest fires. Intertroop communication will be maintained between Scouts in all parts of the State. Concerts, lectures and addresses given at the Municipal Auditorium will be broadcasted. The station is reported to be in charge of 16 Scouts under the leadership of a Scoutmaster who was formerly a radio inspector.
Schenectady, N. Y. Union College broadcasts programs of interest to public.
Seattle, Wash. Post-Intelligencer broadcasts programs of interest to public, including United States Public Health Service Lectures.
Toronto, Canada. Tuesday, 8 to 9.30 P. M. 1,200 meters. Station of the Marconi Telegraph Company of Canada, Limited Radiophone concerts, news bulletins, notices of wireless society meetings and other information. Range about 200 miles.
Washington, D. C. Tuesdays, 7.30 to 9.30 P. M. Station of White & Boyer. Concerts, with short lectures on radio and information of interest to radio amateurs. Planning to broadcast. Keith's vaudeville.
    Tuesday, 4.15 P. M. Naval Air Service Station. Call letters NOF. 1,100 meters Music United States Public Health Service Lectures.
    Wednesday, 9 P. M Same station. 365 meters. Music. Talks on radio.
    Friday, 8.30 P. M. Same station. Music. Music, 9 P. M., United States Public Health Service Lecture
    Sunday, 10.30 A. M. Church of the Covenant. (Transmission by Radio Construction Company. Call letters WDM. 365 meters.) Church service.
    Sunday, 3 P. M. Same church and transmitting station. Addresses by famous men and women on topics of public interest.
    Sunday, 7.30 P. M. Same church and transmitting station. Church service.
    Some of the most important Government stations are located in the vicinity of Washington. The Arlington station of the Navy, call letters NAA, transmits time signals and news on 2,650 meters daily at noon and 10 P. M. This station and the still more powerful one at Annapolis, which transmits similar information on the same schedule, can be heard throughout the United States and in fact throughout a large part of the world. The station at the Bureau of Standards conducts tests in which it has the coöperation of many amateur stations. Then there are Army stations and stations connected with the Army and Navy flying fields. Radio telephones may be heard frequently. Loomis Radio School is planning to broadcast, daily, music played in a local theatre.
Westerly, Rhode Island. Nightly. Whitall Electric Company station. Music and speech.
    The Westinghouse stations at Pittsburgh, Newark, N. J., and Springfield, Massachusetts, are heard here. They transmit on 375 meters concerts, readings, sermons, and news. Schedules are given in reports from a number of preceding cities.
    American Radio and Research Corporation station, Medford Hillside, Massachusetts. See schedule under "Medford Hillside, Mass."
    Radio telephones on board vessels sailing along the coast are frequently heard here.
Anywhere in the United States. With an up-to-date long-wave receiver, it is possible to get the news broadcasted by high powered stations in the British Isles, Germany, France, Italy, Russia, Mexico, West Indies, South America, Hawaii. With the increase in power of transmitting stations world-wide reception has become possible. Radio Central the new commercial station of the Radio Corporation of America, located at Rocky Point, Long Island, New York, has been heard in New Zealand, 10,000 miles away.

Callsigns and Licence Classifications: Most of the stations listed above which have callsigns starting with K or W (WRR, WGI, KYW, KZY, WQB, WJZ, KDKA etc.) held the Limited Commercial licences which, with the adoption of the December 1, 1921 broadcast service regulations, had become mandatory for private broadcasting stations. (Many of these stations had previously held licences in other classifications, especially Experimental and Amateur. Also, it was not uncommon for a station to hold more than one licence, and operate under different callsigns according to the licence classification it fell under at the time it was on the air).

Numerous stations in this list have callsigns that start with a number, which was the Radio Inspection District in which they were located, followed by two or three letters. Despite the similarity of their calls, these stations were actually divided among four different licence classifications, although what they did have in common was that, because of the December 1st regulations, they all were now required to get Limited Commercial licences if they wanted to continue to make broadcasts intended for the general public. Many stations in the above list had standard Amateur licences, which meant they normally transmitted on the congested wavelength of 200 meters (1500 kilohertz). The callsign rule for standard Amateur stations was that the letter following the district number could be anything except X, Y, or Z. Some of the better known standard Amateur stations appearing in the above list are 8UX in Akron, Ohio, 4BQ in Rome, Georgia, 3AWI in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1OJ in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and 4CD in Atlanta, Georgia. The other three licence categories -- Experimental, Technical and Training School, and Special Amateur -- which had callsigns starting with district numbers were known collectively as the Special Land stations. These stations generally were allowed to transmit on the less congested wavelengths between 600 and 200 meters (500 to 1500 kilohertz). Experimental stations had callsigns with an X as the first letter following the district number. Some of the more prominent Experimental stations from this list include 8XB in Cincinnati, Ohio, 2XQ in Schenectady, New York, 1XAD in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, 9XM in Madison, Wisconsin, and 9XAB in Kansas City, Missouri. Technical and Training School licences were most commonly issued to colleges and universities, and their callsigns had a Y immediately after the district number. Technical and Training School stations in this list include 8YO, Columbus, Ohio (Ohio State University), 9YA Iowa City, Iowa (University of Iowa) and 9YY, Lincoln, Nebraska (University of Nebraska). Finally, Special Amateur licences allowed qualified amateurs to legally operate on the less congested wavelengths, and their calls had a Z after the district number. The special Amateur stations include 9ZAF in Denver, Colorado, 3ZO in Parkesburg, Pennsylvania, and 5ZC in Dallas, Texas.

A few U.S. Government stations are also listed. (Government stations were exempt from the private station requirement that broadcast stations have Limited Commercial licences). Stations operated by the U.S. Navy were assigned calls starting with N, for example NAA in Arlington, Virginia. The U.S. Army stations were supposed to use calls starting with WUA to WVZ and WXA to WZZ. However, other Army stations at this time seem to have used whatever calls they wanted, such as Fairfield, Ohio's WL2 and Dayton, Ohio's WA1. Finally, there is one foreign call included--XDA, in Mexico City, Mexico.

Additional Information: The various land station licence classifications are defined in the August 15, 1919 edition of Radio Communication Laws of the United States, beginning with regulation 51. For a detailed review of U.S. callsign practices, see United States Callsign Policies. For a comprehensive overview of the establishment of the Limited Commercial broadcast service and the current status of many of the stations listed above, see United States Pioneer Broadcast Service Stations. And for more information on radio station lists, see Early Radio Station Lists Issued by the U.S. Government.